Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Food Components and Health Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #301534

Title: Cranberry juice consumption lowers markers of cardiometabolic risk, including blood pressure and circulating c-reactive protein, triglyceride, and glucose concentrations in adults

Author
item Novotny, Janet
item Baer, David
item Khoo, Christina - Ocean Spray
item Gebauer, Sarah - University Of Maryland
item Charron, Craig

Submitted to: Journal of Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/17/2015
Publication Date: 6/1/2015
Citation: Novotny Dura, J., Baer, D.J., Khoo, C., Gebauer, S., Charron, C.S. 2015. Cranberry juice consumption lowers markers of cardiometabolic risk, including blood pressure and circulating c-reactive protein, triglyceride, and glucose concentrations in adults. Journal of Nutrition. 145:1185-1193.

Interpretive Summary: Cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and stroke are leading causes of death and illness worldwide. Risk for these conditions are grouped together (called cardiometabolic risk) because they represent three of the top health risks, yet can be changed by lifestyle, including diet. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of low calorie cranberry juice to lower cardiometabolic risk. A double-blind, placebo controlled, parallel arm study was conducted with controlled diets. Thirty women and 26 men completed an 8 week intervention with low calorie cranberry juice or a placebo beverage. Volunteers consumed about 8 oz. twice each day of low calorie cranberry juice or a flavor/color/energy matched placebo daily as part of a controlled diet and provided fasting blood before and after intervention for assessment of cardiometabolic risk. Triglycerides (a type of blood fat) demonstrated a treatment and baseline interactive affect such that individuals consuming low calorie cranberry juice had lower triglyceride compared to placebo, with the effect being greater for individuals who had higher triglycerides values. C-reactive protein is a measure of whole-body inflammation. Increased concentrations are associated with increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases. C-reactive protein was lower for individuals consuming low calorie cranberry juice compared to placebo. Other markers of inflammation were not different between individuals consuming the low calorie cranberry juice or the placebo. Low calorie cranberry juice lowered diastolic blood pressure compared to placebo. Fasting blood sugar (glucose) was lower in the low calorie cranberry juice group compared to the placebo group, and low calorie cranberry juice had a beneficial effect on insulin sensitivity for individuals with high baseline values. Low calorie cranberry juice can improve several risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including triglycerides, c-reactive protein, glucose, and diastolic blood pressure. These results demonstrate that juices prepared from polyphenol-rich berries can lower risk for cardiometabolic diseases. These results are of interest to food manufacturers, public health scientists, physicians, allied health professions, dieticians, and nutritionists.

Technical Abstract: Cardiometabolic risk is the risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or stroke which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Risk for these conditions are grouped together because they represent three of the top health risks, yet can be changed by lifestyle. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of low calorie cranberry juice to lower cardiometabolic risk. A double-blind, placebo controlled, parallel arm study was conducted with controlled diets. Thirty women and 26 men completed an 8 week intervention with low calorie cranberry juice (LCCJ) or a placebo beverage (baseline subject characteristics: 50 y, weight 79 kg, BMI 28 kg/m2, total cholesterol 195 mg/dL, HDL cholesterol 47 mg/dL, LDL cholesterol 125 mg/dL). Volunteers consumed 240 mL twice/d LCCJ or a flavor/color/energy matched placebo daily as part of a controlled diet and provided fasting blood before and after intervention for assessment of cardiometabolic risk. Triglycerides (TG) demonstrated a treatment x baseline interactive affect such that individuals consuming LCCJ had lower TG compared to placebo (101.8±3.7 mg/dL for LCCJ vs. 110.7±3.9 mg/dL for placebo. P=0.027), with the effect being greater for higher TG values. C-reactive protein was lower for individuals consuming LCCJ compared to placebo [7.43±0.12 ln(mg/L) for LCCJ vs. 7.9±0.12 ln(mg/L) for placebo, p=0.0054], while other markers of inflammation (IL-6, IL-10, IL1-beta, TNF-alpha) were not different. LCCJ lowered diastolic blood pressure compared to placebo (69.2±0.8 for LCCJ vs. 71.6±0.8 mm Hg for placebo, p=0.048). Fasting glucose was lower in the LCCJ group (95.85±0.58 mg/dL) compared to the placebo group (97.71±0.60 mg/dL), and LCCJ had a beneficial effect on HOMA-IR for people with high baseline values. Low calorie cranberry juice can improve several risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including triglycerides, c-reactive protein, glucose, and diastolic blood pressure.