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Research Project: Interplay of the Physical Environment, Social Domain, and Intrapersonal Factors on Nutrition and Physical Activity Related Health Behaviors in Children and Adolescents

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Title: Differences in socioeconomic and behavioral explanatory variables for food and nutrition insecurity among United States households with and without children

Author
item Thomson, Jessica
item LANDRY, ALICIA - UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS
item Walls, Tameka

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/20/2023
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Background and aims: Food insecurity affects over 10% of United States households overall and 13% of households with children. The study aims were to determine and compare socioeconomic and behavioral explanatory variables for food and nutrition insecurity by household type based on presence and age of children. Methods: Secondary analysis was performed on an existing dataset collected in 2021 and consisting of households at risk for or experiencing food insecurity. Logistic regression was used to identify significant explanatory variables for food and nutrition insecurity by three household types – at least one child <5 years of age, at least one child =5 years of age, and no children. Results: Greater dietary choice was protective for both food and nutrition insecurity in all three household types [80%-90% decreased odds]. Higher income and more fast-food meals decreased odds (30%-60%) of food insecurity, while more processed meals and greater utilization barriers to healthful meals increased odds (30%-120%) for some household types. Higher income also decreased odds (20%) of nutrition insecurity, while greater fruit and vegetable intake, more processed meals, greater limited availability of foods, greater utilization barriers to healthful meals, and shopping at convenience stores increased odds (20%-760%) for some household types. Conclusions: Dietary choice is an important factor for food and nutrition insecurity in households at risk for or experiencing food insecurity. Differential associations between food and nutrition insecurity and other household characteristics suggests that the presence and age of children may need to be considered when designing interventions or proposing policy to reduce food and nutrition insecurity.