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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Raleigh, North Carolina » Food Science and Market Quality and Handling Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #394305

Research Project: Improvement and Maintenance of Peanuts, Peanut Products and Related Peanut Product Flavor, Shelf Life, Functional Characteristics

Location: Food Science and Market Quality and Handling Research Unit

Title: The effect of feeding whole-in-shell peanuts and high-oleic peanuts to laying hens on ileal nutrient digestibility

Author
item HARDING, KARI - North Carolina State University
item MALHEIROS, DIMITRI - North Carolina State University
item Vu, Thien
item WYSOCKY, REBECCA - North Carolina State University
item MALHEIROS, RAMON - North Carolina State University
item ANDERSON, KENNETH - North Carolina State University
item Toomer, Ondulla

Submitted to: International Journal of Poultry Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/9/2022
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The search for poultry feed ingredients grown locally within the US Southeast and central to US poultry and egg production has become a priority over the years to minimize poultry feed cost and the cost of poultry products. Some livestock feeding trials have demonstrated the effective use of peanuts and peanut by-products as alternative feed ingredients to corn and soybean meal. However, very few or no studies to date have examined the nutrient digestibility of whole in shell peanuts or unblanched high-oleic peanuts in egg-producing hens. Therefore, in this study we aimed to examine the nutrient digestibility of feeding an 8% inclusion of high-oleic peanuts (HOPN), or a 4% inclusion of whole-in-shell peanuts (WPS) in the diets of egg-producing hens. Hens were fed three nutritionally complete experimental diets (HOPN, WPS and conventional control) for 6-weeks with 2% inclusion of an indigestible marker. Feed intake and body weights were recorded weekly, while eggs were collected daily and tabulated. Feed, intestinal, and fecal samples were collected at termination for analysis. There were no significant treatment differences in body weights, feed intake, number of eggs produced, or the ratio of feed consumed per total number of eggs produced. The control and HOPN dietary treatments had improved apparent metabolizable energy relative to the WPS treatment, while the WPS provided the highest level of fat digestibility relative to the other treatments. Protein digestibility was best in the conventional control dietary treatment group and the lowest in the WPS dietary treatment group. In summary, this study demonstrates that HOPN layer hen diets have comparable fat nutrient digestibility and apparent metabolizable energy values to a conventional control layer diet, while WPS poultry diets may require supplemental protein and/or energy in the finished feed. The impact of this study is the additional validation of peanuts as a viable nutrient rich alternative feed ingredient for layers while opening the potential for greater utilization of peanuts in poultry production with positive economic outcomes for the peanut industry.

Technical Abstract: The search for locally grown alternative ingredients has become a priority over the years to recapture nutrients that could be used for animal feed thereby removing them from the waste stream and to minimize the cost of grains and importing them. Though some studies have found that high-oleic peanuts could be used as an alternative to corn, few have looked at their digestibility and none have analyzed the digestibility of whole-in-shell peanuts. Thus, this study aimed to examine feeding an 8% inclusion of high-oleic peanuts (HOPN), or a 4% inclusion of whole-in-shell peanuts (WPS), compared to a conventional control (Control) in a 6-week feeding trial using Celite and an indigestible marker. Forty-eight Shaver hens were randomly assigned to 3 treatments, and individually housed in cages. Feed intake and body weights were recorded weekly, while eggs were collected daily and tabulated. At termination, feed, ileal and fecal samples were collected for analysis. Bodyweights, total feed consumed, total dozens of eggs, and feed conversion ratio were not significantly different between treatments. The apparent metabolizable energy corrected for nitrogen showed significant differences (P < 0.0001) between treatments with the Control and HOPN being higher than WPS. There were no differences between the apparent nitrogen retention of the Control and HOPN, however, the WPS apparent nitrogen retention percentage was significantly less than all the other two treatments (P < 0.05). When analyzing the fat digestibility, WPS treatment had the highest fat with the Control being the lowest (P < 0.0001). The apparent protein digestibility of hens fed the Control diet was significantly greater (P < 0.0001) than either treatment with HOPN being the next highest. The WPS resulted in the lowest digestible protein percentage compared to the other treatments analyzed (P < 0.0001). To conclude, feeding high-oleic peanuts could be beneficial because they have comparable apparent metabolizable energy, apparent nitrogen retention, as well as both apparent fat and protein digestibility to the Control. However, it may not be beneficial to feed whole-in-shell peanuts without supplemental protein and/or energy added to the feed due to lower digestibility values. The impact of this study is the additional validation of peanuts as a viable nutrient rich alternative feed ingredient for layers while opening the potential for greater utilization of peanuts in poultry production with positive economic outcomes for the peanut industry.