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ARS Home » Plains Area » Manhattan, Kansas » Center for Grain and Animal Health Research » Grain Quality and Structure Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #320789

Research Project: Impact of Environmental Variation on Genetic Expression (phenotype) of Hard Winter Wheat Quality Traits

Location: Grain Quality and Structure Research

Title: Distribution of cadmium, iron and zinc in millstreams of hard winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

Author
item GUTTIERI, MARY - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
item Seabourn, Bradford - Brad
item LIU, CAIXIA - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
item BAENZIGER, P. STEPHEN - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
item WATERS, BRIAN - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/15/2015
Publication Date: 11/16/2015
Citation: Guttieri, M.J., Seabourn, B.W., Liu, C., Baenziger, P., Waters, B.M. 2015. Distribution of cadmium, iron and zinc in millstreams of hard winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 63:10681-10688.

Interpretive Summary: This study measured the distribution of cadmium, zinc, and iron in flour and bran streams from high cadmium (0.352 mg kg-1) wheat on an experimental mill that produced twelve flour and four bran streams. Recovery in flour was substantially greater for cadmium (50%) than for zinc (31%) or iron (22%). Cadmium, zinc, and iron in the lowest mineral concentration flour stream that represented the purest endosperm fraction, were 52%, 22%, and 11%, respectively, of initial grain concentration. Results indicated that, relative to zinc and iron, a greater proportion of cadmium was stored in the endosperm, which is the source of white flour.

Technical Abstract: Hard winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a major crop in the Great Plains of the United 14 States, and our previous work demonstrated that wheat genotypes vary for grain cadmium 15 accumulation, with some exceeding the CODEX standard (0.2 mg kg-1). Previous reports of 16 cadmium distribution in flour milling fractions have not included high cadmium grain. This 17 study measured the distribution of cadmium, zinc, and iron in flour and bran streams from high 18 cadmium (0.352 mg kg-1) grain on a pilot mill that produced twelve flour and three bran 19 streams. Recovery in flour was substantially greater for cadmium (50%) than for zinc (31%) or 20 iron (22%). Cadmium, zinc, and iron concentrations in the lowest mineral concentration flour 21 stream, representing the purest endosperm fraction, were 52%, 22%, and 11%, respectively, of 22 the initial grain concentration. Our results indicate that, relative to zinc and iron, a greater 23 proportion of cadmium is stored in the endosperm, which is the source of white flour.