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ARS Home » Plains Area » El Reno, Oklahoma » Grazinglands Research Laboratory » Forage and Livestock Production Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #257095

Title: Review: preweaning, postweaning and carcass trait comparisons for progeny sired by subtropical adapted beef sire breeds at various U.S. locations

Author
item THRIFT, F - University Of Kentucky
item SANDERS, J - Texas A&M University
item Brown, Michael
item BROWN JR., A - University Of Arkansas
item HERRING, A - Texas A&M University
item RILEY, D - Texas A&M University
item DEROUEN, S - Louisiana State University
item HOLLOWAY, J - Texas A&M University
item WYATT, W - Louisiana State University
item VANN, R - Missouri State University
item Chase, Chadwick - Chad
item Cundiff, Larry
item BAKER, J - University Of Georgia

Submitted to: Professional Animal Scientist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/1/2010
Publication Date: 10/1/2010
Citation: Thrift, F.A., Sanders, J.O., Brown, M.A., Brown Jr., A.H., Herring, A.D., Riley, D.G., Derouen, S.M., Holloway, J.W., Wyatt, W.W., Vann, R.C., Chase, C.C., Cundiff, L.V., Baker, J.F. 2010. Review: Preweaning, postweaning and carcass trait comparisons for progeny sired by subtropical adapted beef sire breeds at various U.S. locations. Professional Animal Scientist. 26(5):451-473.

Interpretive Summary: Evaluation of several non-Bos indicus subtropically-adapted sire breeds (Tuli, Romosinuano, Bonsmara, Senepol) suggest that some of these sire breeds may serve as alternatives to some Bos indicus genetic types (Brahman, Boran, Nellore, Indu-Brazil, Gir, Sahiwal) because of their ability to tolerate hot and humid conditions in the U.S. Southeast and Gulf Coast areas while expressing superiority in reproductive and carcass traits. Specifically, considering Brahman as the standard Bos indicus sire breed, results of this review indicate the non-Bos indicus subtropically-adapted sire breeds will contribute to less calving difficulty but are expected to sire progeny that weigh less at weaning, grow at a slower rate postweaning and have lighter carcasses than Brahman-sired progeny. Further, progeny of non-Bos indicus subtropically-adapted sire breeds are expected to have slightly improved carcass merit, especially in regards to carcass tenderness, relative to Brahman-sired progeny. However, there appears to be no advantage in carcass merit for progeny of non-Bos indicus subtropically-adapted sire breeds relative to traditional Bos taurus sire breeds such as Angus and Hereford. Overall, suitability of the non-Bos indicus subtropically-adapted sire breeds, as potential alternatives for Bos indicus genetic types, can be determined only after maternal performance of F1 females has been assessed. Also, it is important to determine if price discounts, similar to what occurs for Bos indicus-influenced cattle, will be incurred for progeny of non-Bos indicus subtropically-adapted sire breeds when marketing occurs through traditional channels.

Technical Abstract: This review represents a summarization of multilocation research results generated during an approximate 22-year period and involves preweaning, postweaning and carcass trait comparisons of progeny sired by Bos indicus (Brahman, Boran, Nellore, Indu-Brazil, Gir, Sahiwal), Bos indicus-derivative (Brangus, Beefmaster, Santa Gertrudis, Gelbray, Simbrah), non-Bos indicus (Tuli, Romosinuano, Bonsmara, Senepol) subtropically-adapted and traditional Bos taurus (Angus, Hereford, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Red Poll) sire breeds. Relative to Brahman-sired progeny, preweaning (weaning weight) and postweaning (postweaning average daily gain, feedlot average daily gain, final feedlot weight) performance is expected to be less for progeny sired by non-Bos indicus subtropically-adapted sire breeds. The non-Bos indicus subtropically-adapted sire breeds contribute to less dystocia and appear to improve carcass merit, especially carcass tenderness, over the Brahman breed. Other Bos indicus sire breeds such as the Gir and Sahiwal, but not Indu-Brazil, contribute to less dystocia compared to the Brahman breed. Relative to Bos indicus and non-Bos indicus subtropically-adapted sire breeds, Bos taurus sire breeds, especially Angus and Hereford, express superior carcass merit in regards to marbling score, quality grade and tenderness.