Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Economic and Societal Benefits of Soil Carbon Management: Cropland and Grazing Land Systems)

Author
item Follett, Ronald - Ron

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/30/2006
Publication Date: 5/25/2007
Citation: Follett, R.F. 2007. Economic and Societal Benefits of Soil Carbon Management: Cropland and Grazing Land Systems. In: Kimble, J.M., Rice, C.W., Reed, D.R., Mooney, S., Follett, R.F. and Lal, R. editors. Soil Carbon Management: Economic, Environmental, and Societal Benefits. London, England: CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group. p. 99-128.

Interpretive Summary: Provides both a historic perspective of US land use as well as background and recent information about the role of agricultural technologies for enhanced soil carbon management and how these are economically and environmentally beneficial. Increasingly soil C sequestration is linked to its role in helping to mitigate inputs of CO2, a greenhouse gas (GHG), into the atmosphere, a role becoming extensively documented in the literature. The process includes the uptake of atmospheric CO2-C by photosynthesis and the subsequent sequestration of the C contained in plant materials into the soil as soil organic carbon (SOC). Additionally documented is that SOC is lost as a result of improper soil management or potential alternative uses of C resources that could otherwise be returned to the soil.

Technical Abstract: This book chapter provides both a historic perspective of US land use as well as to address the role of agricultural technologies for enhanced soil carbon management and how these are economically and environmentally beneficial. Increasingly soil C sequestration is linked to its role in helping to mitigate inputs of CO2, a greenhouse gas (GHG), into the atmosphere, a role becoming extensively documented in the literature. The process includes the uptake of atmospheric CO2-C by photosynthesis and the subsequent sequestration of the C contained in plant materials into the soil as soil organic carbon (SOC). Additionally documented is that SOC is lost as a result of improper soil management or potential alternative uses of C resources that could otherwise be returned to the soil.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
Footer Content Back to Top of Page