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Title: Expression of AMP-activated protein kinase subunits during chicken embryonic and post-hatch development

Author
item Proszkowiec-Weglarz, Monika
item RICHARDS, MARK

Submitted to: Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/7/2007
Publication Date: 4/1/2007
Citation: Proszkowiec-Weglarz, M., Richards, M.P. 2007. Expression of AMP-activated protein kinase subunits during chicken embryonic and post-hatch development [abstract]. FASEB Journal. 21:862.4.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein kinase that senses cellular energy status (AMP/ATP ratio) and acts to maintain energy homeostasis by regulating the activities of energy-consuming and energy-generating metabolic pathways. AMPK is a heterotrimeric enzyme complex consisting of one catalytic (alpha) and two regulatory (beta and gamma) subunits, each of which having multiple isoforms. The objective of this study was to investigate AMPK subunit mRNA and protein expression in liver, brain, heart and skeletal muscle from day 12 of embryogenesis (e12) through 3 wk post-hatch (PH) in chickens. Significant changes in AMPK subunit mRNA expression occurred in all tissues from e12 to hatch. At the hatch, the pattern of AMPK subunit mRNA expression was similar to that observed by 3 wk PH in all tissues except for skeletal muscle where gamma-3 subunit mRNA expression was significantly lower than that of the other two gamma subunits. However, gamma-3 mRNA was predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle starting on day 2 PH and continuing through 3 wk. Differences at the protein level of the active (phosphorylated) form of AMPK, as well as the alpha and beta subunits were observed in all four tissues during embryonic development. Together, our results demonstrate expression and activity of AMPK in key tissues during the transition from embryonic to post-hatch development in chickens.