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Title: CHILE PEPPER RSPONSE TO NITROGEN FERTILIZATION IN THE ARKANSAS VALLEY OF COLORADO. COLORADO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION TECHNICAL BULLETIN TR05

Author
item Halvorson, Ardell
item BARTOLO, MICHAEL
item Reule, Curtis

Submitted to: Agricultural Experiment Station Publication
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/26/2005
Publication Date: 10/1/2007
Citation: Halvorson, A.D., Bartolo, M., Reule, C.A. 2007. Chile pepper rsponse to nitrogen fertilization in the Arkansas Valley of Colorado. Colorado Agric. Exp. Sta. Technical Report TR07-14, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. p. 65-68

Interpretive Summary: In 2004, we evaluated the effects of N fertilization (6 N rates) on chile pepper fresh yield and biomass accumulation following four years of continuous corn production. A controlled release N fertilizer (Polyon®3) was used. Fresh chile pepper yields increased with increasing N rate up to about 90 to 120 lb N/a then leveled off. Estimated gross economic returns reflected the fresh chile pepper yield. Total plant biomass production increased with increasing N rate. Plant size (stems + leaves) had maximized by the September 1 sampling date while pepper yield continued to increase until final harvest. Total N uptake increased from 101 lb N/a with no N fertilizer applied to 180 lb N/a with 120 lb/a of fertilizer N applied, resulting in an estimated N fertilizer use efficiency (NUE) of about 66%. Residual soil NO3-N levels were relatively low in the spring before planting chile pepper, but did increase slightly with higher N rate applied to the previous corn crops. Residual soil NO3-N levels were even lower after chile pepper harvest. This may indicate that chile pepper was effective in utilizing soil residual N from the root zone or that the residual N was leached out of the root zone by the frequent irrigations.

Technical Abstract: In 2004, we evaluated the effects of N fertilization (6 N rates) on chile pepper fresh yield and biomass accumulation following four years of continuous corn production. A controlled release N fertilizer (Polyon®3) was used. Fresh chile pepper yields increased with increasing N rate up to about 90 to 120 lb N/a then leveled off. Estimated gross economic returns reflected the fresh chile pepper yield. Total plant biomass production increased with increasing N rate. Plant size (stems + leaves) had maximized by the September 1 sampling date while pepper yield continued to increase until final harvest. Total N uptake increased from 101 lb N/a with no N fertilizer applied to 180 lb N/a with 120 lb/a of fertilizer N applied, resulting in an estimated N fertilizer use efficiency (NUE) of about 66%. Residual soil NO3-N levels were relatively low in the spring before planting chile pepper, but did increase slightly with higher N rate applied to the previous corn crops. Residual soil NO3-N levels were even lower after chile pepper harvest. This may indicate that chile pepper was effective in utilizing soil residual N from the root zone or that the residual N was leached out of the root zone by the frequent irrigations.