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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: SELENIUM (SE) AND VITAMIN E (VE) DEFICIENCIES IMPAIR INTESTINAL FUNCTION AND RESULT IN PERSISTENT INFECTION WITH HELIGMOSOMOIDES POLYGYRUS)

Author
item Smith, Allen
item Madden, Kathleen
item Zhao, Aiping
item Auyeung, Karla
item Levander, Orville
item Finkelman, Fred
item Urban, Joseph
item Shea Donohue, P

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/13/2003
Publication Date: 3/24/2004
Citation: Smith, A.D., Madden, K., Zhao, A., Auyeung, K., Levander, O.A., Finkelman, F., Urban Jr, J.F., Shea Donohue, P.T. 2004. Selenium (se) and vitamin E (ve) deficiencies impair intestinal function and result in persistent infection with heligmosomoides polygyrus [abstract]. Federation of American Society of Experimental Biology Journal. 18(4):A9.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Intestinal nematode parasites are responsible for significant morbidity world-wide especially in malnourished populations that express limited immunity and poor worm clearance. Selenium (Se) and vitamin E (VE) deficiencies are likely in the malnourished and contribute to increased pathogenesis following infection with coxsackie- or influenza virus and the protozoan Trypanasoma cruzi, but have not been studied following a nematode infection. Mice infected with the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus (Hp) exhibit a chronic infection that when drug-cleared induces a memory response to a challenge infection characterized by enhanced immune clearance associated with decreased intestinal epithelial cell glucose absorption, increased mucosal permeability, and enhanced smooth muscle contractility. Both Se and/or VE deficiencies resulted in increased worm persistence and egg production during a memory response compared to mice fed an adequate diet. The characteristic increase in serum IL-4 levels was observed in all Hp-infected mice regardless of diet; however, the pattern of decreased glucose absorption and increased smooth muscle contractility was impaired in VE but not Se deficient mice in spite of diet-independent changes in Hp-induced mucosal permeability and Cl- secretion. These results suggest that Se and VE deficiencies impair the host intestinal memory response to Hp infection via two different mechanisms.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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