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Title: DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRATED STRATEGIES FOR MANAGEMENT OF SOILBORNE PEANUT DISEASES

Author
item JACKSON, KEN
item DAMICONE, JOHN
item MELOUK, HASSAN

Submitted to: Oklahoma Agriculture Experiment Station Departmental Publication
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/4/1997
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Article summarizes current status of research efforts; no new research reported.

Technical Abstract: Several soilborne diseases adversely affect peanut health and productivity in Oklahoma and other peanut producing states. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a management system for peanut production with minimum input for sustaining profitably under the new farm commodity program. Several advanced runner peanut lines from the breeding program at Texas A&M University and Oklahoma State University were evaluated for resistance to sclerotinia blight in field plots at multi-locations in Oklahoma and Texas. Several of these lines exhibited high levels of sclerotinia resistance for several years under heavy disease pressure. These lines have seed size equal to or larger than Okrun. Research on cropping systems began in 1992 to determine the effects of cropping sequence and cover crops (including soil amendments) on soilborne diseases of peanut. The greatest benefit from crop rotation was the reduction but not elimination of the root-knot nematode population density for the first year following a non-host rotation. The root-knot nematode population recovered and was damaging on the second year peanuts following a crop rotation. Non-host crops such as grain sorghum and sudan grass contributed to lowering propagules of soilborne fungi but not to levels below a damage threshold. Results showed that cover crops and soil amendments reduced disease incidence. Therefore, new studies were initiated to combine crop rotation sequences with soil amendments (rape seed meal) and/or cover crops to determine if one of these combinations will economically reduce soilborne diseases of peanuts.