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ARS Home » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #62825

Title: MANAGEMENT OF SOILBORNE FUNGAL PATHOGENS (CHAPTER IN PEANUT HEALTH MANAGEMENT, APS PRESS)

Author
item Melouk, Hassan
item BACKMAN, P

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/24/1995
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Book chapter describing state-of-the-art relative to peanut health management; review article with no new research reported; no interpretive summary required.

Technical Abstract: Shortly after planting, a peanut grower may encounter problems, such as reduced germination and poor stand establishment, related to soil environment. Several soil-inhabiting pathogens cause diseases that adversely affect peanut health and productivity throughout the growing areas of the United States. Some of these diseases, such as pod rot complex, crown rot, southern blight, and root knot, occur in all of the peanut-producing areas of the United States. Others are problems only in certain production areas. Blackhull disease, for example, is limited to New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, and Sclerotinia blight is limited to Oklahoma, North Carolina, Texas, and Virginia. Most of the pathogens that cause these diseases have broad host ranges, including crops and weeds, and are able to live on plant debris and produce resistant survival structures that reduce the efficacy of disease-management practices such as crop rotation. Compounding these problems is the shortage of effective chemicals availabl for use by growers. In this chapter, we discuss the most common and important soilborne disease problems affecting the peanut plant throughout its life, including seed and seedling diseases; Aspergillus crown rot; Rhizoctonia limb, pod, and root rot; stem rot (southern blight); Cylindrocladium black rot; Sclerotinia blight; Verticillium wilt; Pythium pod rot; blackhull; and other minor diseases.