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Title: REGISTRATION OF AMIGO WHEAT GERMPLASM RESISTANT TO GREENBUG MODIFIED TO SHOW TITLE AS ACTUALLY PUBLISHED

Author
item SEBESTA EMIL E
item WOOD E A JR
item Porter, David
item WEBSTER JAMES A
item SMITH ED L

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Germplasm Release
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/31/1994
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: This article registers Amigo wheat germplasm which was formally released by USDA-ARS and Okla. Agric. Exp. Stn. in 1976. No unreported research is documented; no interpretive summary is required.

Technical Abstract: `Amigo' is a greenbug-resistant red winter wheat developed by USDA-ARS in cooperation with Okla. Agric. Exp. Stn. and formally released in 1976. Amigo (previously designated 73G132X5) resists greenbug biotypes B and C. Greenbug resistance is controlled by a single dominant gene, originally detected in a strain of `Insave F.A.' rye and transferred to wheat through an x-ray-induced chromosomal translocation. In 1966, a greenbug-resistant strain of Insave F.A. was crossed with susceptible `Chinese Spring' wheat. Analysis of Amigo crosses with Chinese Spring monosomic series indicated Amigo has at least 2 translocations, and the greenbug resistance gene is located on chromosome 1A. Further cytogenetic analysis of Amigo revealed that the complete wheat chromosome arm 1AS was replaced by rye chromosome arm 1RS. Amigo carries the rye protein marker gene Sec-1 located on chromosome arm 1RS and is missing wheat endosperm storage protein genes located on wheat chromosome arm 1AS. Amigo is resistant to the wheat curl mite. Powdery mildew resistance gene Pm17 has been located on chromosome arm 1RS. Amigo carries 2 stem rust resistance genes: one associated with chromosome arm 1RS, and the other, Sr24, associated with an Agropyron elongatum translocation. The rye-derived resistance gene has not been distinguished from Sr31 on the basis of pathogenicity tests and meaningful genetic comparisons have not been undertaken. The Agropyron translocation, which may have originated from Teewon, also is associated with leaf rust resistance gene Lr24. Amigo was released as a composite of 30 X5 families of 73G132. It is mid-season in maturity, mid-tall, awned, and has white straw and chaff. Amigo has been used as a parent in the development of such wheat cultivars as TAM-107, TAM-200, and Century.