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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Poultry Microbiological Safety and Processing Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #378186

Research Project: Production and Processing Intervention Strategies for Poultry Associated Foodborne Pathogens

Location: Poultry Microbiological Safety and Processing Research Unit

Title: Assessment of stabilized hydrogen peroxide for use in reducing Campylobacter levels and prevalence on broiler chicken wings

Author
item BOURASSA, DIANNA - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Harris, Caitlin
item Bartenfeld Josselson, Lydia
item Buhr, Richard - Jeff

Submitted to: Journal of Food Protection
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/25/2020
Publication Date: 10/30/2020
Citation: Bourassa, D.V., Harris, C.E., Bartenfeld Jossel, L.N., Buhr, R.J. 2020. Assessment of stabilized hydrogen peroxide for use in reducing Campylobacter levels and prevalence on broiler chicken wings. Journal of Food Protection. 84(3):449-455. https://doi.org/10.4315/JFP-20-356.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4315/JFP-20-356

Interpretive Summary: Poultry meat processing establishments utilize antimicrobial processing aids on carcass parts to minimize Campylobacter contamination and in these experiments we evaluated a stabilized hydrogen peroxide (SHP) as a potential antimicrobial processing aid. In a series of experiments, chicken wing segments with skin were inoculated with 1 to 10 million cells of Campylobacter. Segments were treated with SHP at 15,000 or 30,000 ppm, peroxyacetic acid (PAA) at 300 or 3,000 ppm, or water applied by either dip or spray. In Experiment 1, samples were analyzed the same day after 2 h for Campylobacter or after 24 h refrigeration. In Experiments 2 to 4, all samples were analyzed on the same day as treated. Rinsates from each wing segment were analyzed for Campylobacter. In each experiment, treatment with SHP or PAA significantly reduced levels of inoculated Campylobacter in comparison to water treated controls by an additional 10 to 25% with greater reductions observed with higher inoculum levels. At high inoculum levels (1 to 10 million), SHP and PAA applied by dip had 10% greater reductions of Campylobacter levels as compared to spray treated wing segments. Additionally, wing drumettes were observed to retain have higher levels and prevalence of Campylobacter recovery compared to wing flats at a low inoculation level. These results indicate that while there was no carry-over effect of SHP (same day vs. 24 h), dip treatment with SHP or PAA significantly decreased Campylobacter recovery on broiler chicken wing segments compared to a water control. Although Campylobacter reductions were modest, SHP was demonstrated to have similar efficacy as the commonly used processing aid, PAA and therefore may be a prospective antimicrobial alternative. SHP shows potential for further investigation as an antimicrobial processing aid for use on poultry parts.

Technical Abstract: Poultry processing establishments utilize antimicrobial processing aids on broiler parts to minimize Campylobacter contamination. A stabilized hydrogen peroxide (SHP) product was assessed for use as an antimicrobial processing aid. In a series of experiments, wing segments with skin were inoculated with 10^3-7 cells of Campylobacter coli. Segments were treated with SHP at 15,000 or 30,000 mg/L, peroxyacetic acid at 300 or 3,000 mg/L, or water applied by either dip or spray. In Experiment 1, samples were analyzed the same day after 2 h for Campylobacter or after 24 h refrigeration. In Experiments 2 to 4, all samples were analyzed on the same day as treated. Rinsates from each wing segment were analyzed for direct counts and prevalence of Campylobacter. In each experiment, treatment with SHP or PAA significantly reduced levels of inoculated Campylobacter in comparison to water controls up to 2.22 log CFU/mL with greater reductions observed with higher inoculum levels. At high inoculum levels (10^6-7), SHP and PAA applied by dip had up to 1.27 log CFU/mL greater reductions of Campylobacter levels as compared to spray treated wing segments. Additionally, wing drumettes were observed to retain have higher levels and prevalence of Campylobacter recovery compared to wing flats at a low inoculation level (103). These results indicate that while there was no carry-over effect of SHP (same day vs. 24 h), dip treatment with SHP or PAA decreased Campylobacter recovery on broiler chicken wing segments compared to a water control. Although log reductions were modest, SHP was demonstrated to have similar efficacy as the commonly used processing aid, PAA, against Campylobacter levels may be a prospective antimicrobial alternative. SHP shows potential for further investigation as an antimicrobial processing aid for use on poultry parts.