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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Food Composition and Methods Development Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #279812

Title: Chromatographic and mass spectrometric fingerprinting analyses of angelica sinensis (Oliv.) diels dietary supplements

Author
item Zhao, Yang - UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
item Sun, Jianhao - UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
item Yu, Liangli (lucy) - UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
item Chen, Pei

Submitted to: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/15/2013
Publication Date: 1/15/2013
Citation: Zhao, Y., Sun, J., Yu, L., Chen, P. 2013. Chromatographic and mass spectrometric fingerprinting analyses of angelica sinensis (Oliv.) diels dietary supplements. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry. doi: 10.1007/s00216-012-6668-1.

Interpretive Summary: Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels (“Danggui” in Chinese) is one of the most commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs). It has been used to invigorate blood circulation for the treatment of anemia, hypertension, chronic bronchitis, asthma, rheumatism and cardiovascular diseases. There are many A. sinensis dietary supplements in the US market. However, no study has been conducted to investigate the quality of these dietary supplements. In this paper, high-performance liquid chromatographic and flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprints were both evaluated to assess the consistency of A. sinensis dietary supplements . The results demonstrated that there were significant chemical differences between A. sinensis dietary supplements in the US market.

Technical Abstract: Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels (“Danggui” in Chinese) is one of the most commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs). It has been used to invigorate blood circulation for the treatment of anemia, hypertension, chronic bronchitis, asthma, rheumatism and cardiovascular diseases. There are a lot of A. sinensis dietary supplements in the US market. However, no study has been conducted to investigate the quality of these dietary supplements. In this paper, high-performance liquid chromatographic and flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprints were both evaluated to assess the consistency of A. sinensis-derived dietary supplements. Similarity analysis was carried out based on HPLC/UV chromatographic fingerprints. The FIMS fingerprinting method could analyze each sample in 2 min, compared to 30 minutes required for the chromatographic fingerprint. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the FIMS fingerprints was performed. Both methods showed significant chemical differences between samples. The loadings plot obtained from PCA singled out the discriminatory ions that were responsible for chemical differences of A. sinensis-derived dietary supplements.