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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DIETARY CAROTENOIDS, RETINOIDS, AND BIOACTIVATES ON HEALTHY AGING

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Composition and stability of phytochemicals in five varieties of black soybeans (glycine max))

Author
item Correa, Camila
item Li, Lei
item Aldini, Giancarlo
item Carini, Marina
item Chen, Oliver
item Chun, Hye-kyung
item Cho, Soo-muk
item Park, Ki-moon
item Russell, Robert
item Blumberg, Jeffrey
item Yeum, Kyung-jin

Submitted to: Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer reviewed journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/18/2010
Publication Date: 6/18/2010
Citation: Correa, C.R., Li, L., Aldini, G., Carini, M., Chen, O., Chun, H., Cho, S., Park, K., Russell, R.M., Blumberg, J.B., Yeum, K. 2010. Composition and stability of phytochemicals in five varieties of black soybeans (glycine max). Food Chemistry. 123:1176-1184.

Interpretive Summary: The nutrient components of five different types of black soybeans were determined, as well as how long these components were stable at room temperature, 4 degrees celsius and -80 degrees celsius over 14 months. Furthermore, various sophisticated instruments were utilized to analyze chemical components in these black soybeans. The amount of a specific form of vitamin E (y-tocopherol), fat-soluble pigment (lutein) contained in five different types of black soybeans are varied. Organic compounds, total phenols, in black soybeans stored at room temperature, 4 degrees celsius or -80 degrees celsius were stable for 14 months. On the other hand, vitamin E (y-tocopherol) and fat-soluble pigment (lutein) contained in black soybeans rapidly degraded within a month at room temperature. The current study indicates that black soybeans are a rich source of vitamin E and phenols, and that levels vary depending upon types. In addition, storage at low temperatures is recommended to reduce the loss of fat-soluble nutrient components in black soybeans over an extended period of time. This study provides essential information for the development of dietary supplement using this plant food.

Technical Abstract: Phytochemical compositions of five varieties of black soybeans (Glycine max) and their stabilities at room temperature, 4 deg.C and -80 deg.C over 14 months were determined by HPLC systems with electrochemical (HPLC-ECD) and UV detectors. Polyphenol profiling was carried out by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) with an orbitrap as a mass analyzer in both positive and negative ion modes, and polyphenols in aglycone forms were quantified by HPLC-ECD. Five different varieties of black soybeans (Glycine max) contained 249-405 g dry weight of y-tocopherol and 6.76-14.98 g dry weight of lutein. Major polyphenols in black soybeans (Glycine max) were daidzein (193-288 g dry weight) and genistein 145-223 g dry weight), mainly presents as glucosides and acetyl glucosides. No significant decrease was found in total phenols of stored black soybeans (Glycine max) stored at room temperature, 4 deg.C or -80 deg.C for 14 months. On the other hand, lutein and y-tocopherol degraded significantly within a month of storage at room temperature (p<0.01), whereas they remained stable up to 6 months at 4 deg.C and up to 14 months at -80 deg.C. The current study indicates that black soybeans (Glycine max) are a rich source of y-tocopherol and phenols (isoflavones, flavonols, flavan-3-ols, proanthocyanidins and anthocyanin) and that the levels vary depending upon varieties. In addition, storage at low temperature is recommended to reduce the loss of fat- soluble phytochemicals in black soybeans (Glycine max) over an extended period of time.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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