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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #247741

Title: Effect variants of the CD36 gene and metabolic syndrome in Boston Puerto Rican adults

Author
item NOEL, SABRINA - JEAN MAYER HUMAN NUTRITION RESEARCH CENTER ON AGING AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY
item Lai, Chao Qiang
item MATTEI, JOSIEMER - JEAN MAYER HUMAN NUTRITION RESEARCH CENTER ON AGING AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY
item Parnell, Laurence
item ORDOVAS, JOSE - JEAN MAYER HUMAN NUTRITION RESEARCH CENTER ON AGING AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY
item TUCKER, KATHERINE - JEAN MAYER HUMAN NUTRITION RESEARCH CENTER ON AGING AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Atherosclerosis
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/12/2010
Publication Date: 7/1/2010
Citation: Noel, S.E., Lai, C., Mattei, J., Parnell, L.D., Ordovas, J., Tucker, K.L. 2010. Effect variants of the CD36 gene and metabolic syndrome in Boston Puerto Rican adults. Atherosclerosis. 211(1):210-215.

Interpretive Summary: Puerto Ricans experience a high prevalence of several chronic conditions, including metabolic syndrome. Genetic variants of the CD36 gene have been associated with metabolic syndrome. We aimed to determine the relationship between 6 such variants of CD36 and metabolic syndrome, along with its contributors (large waist, low HDL-cholesterol, high triglyceride levels, hypertension, use of insulin) in a group of Puerto Ricans, aged 45-75 years, living in the Greater Boston area. The relationships between each of the 6 CD36 variants, metabolic syndrome and its contributors were examined with statistical approaches. Groups of variants were also examined in concert in order to increase the statistical power of the analysis. For two variants, persons carrying two versions of the rare version showed higher likelihood of metabolic syndrome relative to persons carrying one or two versions of the common variants. CD36 variants showed relationships with metabolic syndrome in Puerto Ricans. Future studies should explore these initial observations, particularly as CD36 binds long chain fatty acids and oxidized LDL-cholesterol.

Technical Abstract: Objective: Puerto Ricans experience a high prevalence of several chronic conditions, including metabolic syndrome. Genetic variants of the CD36 gene have been associated with metabolic syndrome. We aimed to determine the association between 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for CD36 and metabolic syndrome and its components in Puerto Ricans (45-75 y) living in the Greater Boston area. Methods: Associations between each SNP, metabolic syndrome and its components were examined using multivariate logistic regression models. Haplotype trend regression analysis was used to determine associations between haplotypes and metabolic syndrome. Results: For two SNPs of CD36 (rs1049673 and rs3211931), homozygous subjects of the minor allele (G and T, respectively) were associated with a higher likelihood of metabolic syndrome (odd ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.89 (1.0, 3.5) and 1.77 (1.0, 3.1), respectively) relative to carriers of the major allele. Although CD36 haplotypes were not significantly associated with metabolic syndrome overall (global significance, P=0.23), one haplotype (G-C-C vs. C-C-C (reference haplotype) was marginally associated (P=0.049). Conclusion: SNPs of CD36 were associated with metabolic syndrome in Puerto Ricans. Prospective studies should further explore the role of CD36 variants in the development of this condition.