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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS TO REDUCE METHYL BROMIDE FUMIGATIONS FOR CONTROL OF INSECTS IN POSTHARVEST STRUCTURES

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Title: Development, relative retention, and productivity of red flour beetle on resistant starches)

Author
item Xue, Meng
item Subramanyam, Bhadriraju
item Campbell, James - Jim

Submitted to: Methyl Bromide Alternatives and Emissions Research Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/25/2009
Publication Date: 11/10/2009
Citation: Xue, M., Subramanyam, B., Campbell, J.F. 2009. Development, relative retention, and productivity of red flour beetle on resistant starches. Methyl Bromide Alternatives and Emissions Research Conference Proceedings. November 10-12, 2009, San Diego, California. p. 73-1 - 73-3.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The development, relative retention, and fecundity of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), on six different types of starches, flour, and flour plus yeast was investigated in the laboratory. The viability of T. castaneum eggs was checked initially by placing 100 eggs in 9-cm diameter glass Petri dishes. Larval length and head capsule width of T. castaneum reared on starches were smaller when compared with larvae reared on flour and flour plus yeast. Weight gain of larvae reared on resistant starches was also less than those reared on flour or flour plus yeast. Larval mortality was high on all starches compared with flour and flour plus yeast. Adults did not show any preference for flour over starches, but laid few eggs on starch. These results suggest that resistant starches hindered T. castaneum development and thus may have potential in managing the development and reproduction of T. castaneum—a pest that is common and severe in food-processing facilities.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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