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Title: Strawberry Part 3 - structural and functional genomics

Author
item Slovin, Janet
item MICHAEL, TODD

Submitted to: Genetics, Genomics and Breeding of Berries
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/17/2010
Publication Date: 5/16/2011
Citation: Slovin, J.P., Michael, T.P. 2011. Strawberry Part 3 - structural and functional genomics. In: Folta, K.M., Cole, C., editors. Genetics, Genomics and Breeding of Berries. Enfield, NH: Science Publishers. p. 240-308.

Interpretive Summary: There is an increasing interest in applying the knowledge gained from the study of laboratory model plants to crop plants. Many of these, such as the tree crops like apple and peach, present special challenges for studying how their genes affect growth and response to the environment. This chapter describes the current state of the study of genes, proteins, and metabolites in strawberry, a plant that is closely related to important tree crops as well as being an important crop in itself. This chapter describes new measurements of the amount of DNA in strawberry cells that are important for sequencing strawberry DNA. A new analysis of strawberry gene sequences publicly available clearly shows the current lack of important strawberry gene information. This chapter will be useful for scientists just entering the field, as well as established scientists already working to improve production and quality of these crops.

Technical Abstract: The area of strawberry genomics is rapidly changing because of the burgeoning interest in, and need for, reference plants for the Rosaceae family, which contains many important fruit, nut, ornamental and wood crops, including peach, apple, almond, rose and cherry. This chapter describes the current state of Fragaria (strawberry) genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, summarizes some of the recent progress that has been made in strawberry gene discovery and characterization, and includes new data describing the DNA content of several diploid genotypes. This information is important for the current sequencing genome effort and resulted in surprising new insights into the variability in genome size among diploid accessions. The chapter also presents a new bioinformatic analysis of the sequence information available for strawberry in GenBank. This chapter will be invaluable for scientists becoming interested in applying knowledge gained from the model plant system, Arabidopsis, to an important group of crop plants. It will also be of interest to established scientists in the field.