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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Monitoring for Success)

Author
item Sharrow, S
item Seefeldt, Steven - Steve

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/30/2005
Publication Date: 1/12/2006
Citation: Sharrow, S.H., Seefeldt, S.S. 2006. Monitoring for Success. In: Daines, R., Launchbaugh, K., Walker, J., editors. Targeted Grazing: a natural approach to vegetation management and landscape enhancement. Centennial, CO. Cottrell Printing. p. 40-49.

Interpretive Summary: Unless vegetation is measured and the data stored for comparison with subsequent measures it is impossible to prove to yourself or anybody else that a livestock management strategy is impacting the vegetation. This book chapter describes what the goal of vegetation monitoring is and what the objectives for vegetation monitoring are. A section is devoted to what needs to be measured and describes the most frequently measured aspects of grazing. A description of important plant characteristics for measurement is given as well as a guide for the characteristics specifically associated with particular types of plants. A discussion of how to monitor includes, setting up sample plots, selecting where and when to measure, using controls, the importance of replication, the use of photos, and data storage. Only through monitoring will we be able to impartially assess the costs and benefits of grazing management, learn from mistakes and replicate successes.

Technical Abstract: Unless vegetation is measured and the data stored for comparison with subsequent measures it is impossible to prove to yourself or anybody else that a livestock management strategy is impacting the vegetation. This book chapter describes what the goal of vegetation monitoring is and what the objectives for vegetation monitoring are. A section is devoted to what needs to be measured and describes the most frequently measured aspects of grazing. A description of important plant characteristics for measurement is given as well as a guide for the characteristics specifically associated with particular types of plants. A discussion of how to monitor includes, setting up sample plots, selecting where and when to measure, using controls, the importance of replication, the use of photos, and data storage. Only through monitoring will we be able to impartially assess the costs and benefits of grazing management, learn from mistakes and replicate successes.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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