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Title: CELLULAR DISTRIBUTION OF ANIONIC ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDE IN NORMAL LUNG AND DURING ACUTE PULMONARY INFLAMMATION

Author
item FALES-WILLIAMS, A
item Brogden, Kim
item HUFFMAN, E
item GALLUP, J
item ACKERMANN, MARK

Submitted to: Veterinary Pathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/20/2002
Publication Date: 11/20/2002
Citation: FALES-WILLIAMS, A.J., BROGDEN, K.A., HUFFMAN, E., GALLUP, J.M., ACKERMANN, M.R. CELLULAR DISTRIBUTION OF ANIONIC ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDE IN NORMAL LUNG AND DURING ACUTE PULMONARY INFLAMMATION. VETERINARY PATHOLOGY. 2002. v. 39(6). p. 706-711.

Interpretive Summary: Respiratory tract diseases are a leading cause of loss from disease in the cattle industry. Annual loss from mortality, reduced feed efficiency, slaughter condemnations, and treatment measures is estimated to exceed one billion dollars. As part of our ongoing studies to understand the natural, innate immune system, we assessed the cellular distribution of anionic antimicrobial peptide in normal lung and during acute pulmonary inflammation. Anionic peptides (APs) are small antimicrobial peptides present in human and ovine lung. In this study, APs were also detected in bovine lung, and production of APs in lungs with acute inflammation induced by various stimuli was determined. In lungs with acute inflammation, AP distribution and intensity were similar to those in control, normal lungs and slightly decreased in bronchioles. This work demonstrates that AP is present in lung of cattle and is thereby conserved among two ruminant species and man. Distribution and intensity of AP production are not enhanced by infection or acute inflammation and are decreased in bronchioles, which suggest that AP is constitutively produced.

Technical Abstract: Anionic peptides (APs) are small antimicrobial peptides present in human and ovine lung. In this study, APs were also detected in bovine lung, and production of APs in lungs with acute inflammation induced by various stimuli was determined. The distribution and intensity of APs were determined by immunohistochemistry and western blots in lungs of 1) neonatal calves (1-3 days of age) inoculated with Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica, a known inducer of the bovine beta-defensin lingual antimicrobial peptide (LAP) or pyrogen-free saline (PFS), and 2) growing calves (3 months of age) similarly inoculated with M. haemolytica, a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from M. haemolytica, an LPS-associated protein from M. haemolytica, or PFS. AP immunoreactivity was detected in bands (approximate weights) in the western blots of lung at 28-30 (strongest signal), 31, 45, and 52-60 Kd regardless of inoculum. The adult cow lacked bands at 45 Kd, but it had additional bands at 64 (inconsistently) and 35-38 Kd. In lungs with acute inflammation, AP distribution and intensity were similar to those in control lungs and slightly decreased in bronchioles. This work demonstrates that AP is present in lung of cattle and is thereby conserved among two ruminant species and man. Distribution and intensity of AP production are not enhanced by infection or acute inflammation and are decreased in bronchioles, which suggest that AP is constitutively produced.