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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: EFFECT OF 1-METHYLCYCLOPROPENE ON THE QUALITY OF FRESH-CUT APPLE SLICES)

Author
item Perera, Conrad
item Balchin, Leanne
item Baldwin, Elizabeth - Liz
item Stanley, Roger
item Hort, Meisheng Tian

Submitted to: Journal of Food Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/8/2003
Publication Date: 8/1/2003
Citation: Perera, C.O., Balchin, L., Baldwin, E., Stanley, R., Tian, M. Effect of 1-methylcyclopropene on the quality of fresh-cut apple slices. Journal of Food Science. 2003. v. 68(6). p. 1910-1914.

Interpretive Summary: Cut apple slices would make a popular nutritious snack for airlines, schools, and for display in supermarkets. Cutting of fruit, however, sets off chemical reactions that include ethylene production. Ethylene is a natural gaseous plant product that promotes deterioration. 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) is a compound that blocks fruit reaction to ethylene. In this study intact apples were treated with 1-MCP to prevent ethylene production and action after cutting into slices, thereby increasing the marketing life of the apple slices.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this project was to treat fresh-cut apple slices with the ethylene-action inhibitor, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), in order to retard ethylene-induced deterioration and senescence, and prolong the shelf life of such products. Intact Braeburn and Pacific Rose apples were treated, at different times, with 1-MCP, cut and stored at 0°C. Samples were analyzed initially and then weekly for ethylene production, respiration rate, flesh firmness, tissue colour and soluble solids content during 5 weeks of storage. Titratable acidity was also measured at various stages over the storage period. 1-MCP treatment was effective in reducing ethylene production, respiration rates, and loss of firmness in addition to maintaining tissue colour of slices when applied to whole apples directly after harvest. The total sugar and acidity levels were not affected to any great extent by this compound.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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