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Title: Campylobacgter: An enigma

Author
item Cray, Paula
item HEADRICK, MARCIA
item Englen, Mark
item Gray, Jeffrey
item Jackson, Charlene
item Tankson, Jeanetta
item ANANDARAMAN, NEENA
item SALAMONE, BEN
item ROSE, BONNIE
item DARGATZ, DAVID

Submitted to: Association of Analytical Committees
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/28/2003
Publication Date: 9/14/2003
Citation: Cray, P.J., Headrick, M.L., Englen, M.D., Gray, J.T., Jackson, C.R., Tankson, J.D., Anandaraman, N., Salamone, B., Rose, B., Dargatz, D.A. 2003. Campylobacgter: An enigma [abstract]. Association of Analytical Committees. September 14-18,2013. Atlanta, Georgia.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Campylobacter rivals Salmonella as the number one cause of bacterial food borne illness in the United States. Although it is as ubiquitous in nature as Salmonella, recovery of Campylobacter is problematic. While the majority of chickens appear to be colonized with Campylobacter at slaughter, it is not typically recovered from flocks until 2 to 3 weeks of age. Interestingly, while flies, birds, insects, and rodents appear to be vectors for Campylobacter, the source of Campylobacter remains unknown. As part of the animal arm of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS), antimicrobial resistance is tracked in Campylobacter from animal sources. Recovery of Campylobacter from samples, speciation of isolates, and determination of antimicrobial resistance patterns have been challenging. Use of antimicrobials in the culture media can confound recovery. Further, mixed population have been observed and aggregation of some strains not only affects speciation, but antimicrobial testing as well. These phenomena will be discussed and results from the NARMS program will be presented.