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Title: PASTURE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES OF NEW JERSEY EQUINE OWNERS

Author
item KLUCHINSKI, D
item Singer, Jeremy
item BAMKA, W

Submitted to: American Society of Agronomy Branch Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/17/2002
Publication Date: 7/17/2002
Citation: KLUCHINSKI, D., SINGER, J.W., BAMKA, W.J. PASTURE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES OF NEW JERSEY EQUINE OWNERS. NORTHEAST BRANCH OF AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRONOMY ABSTRACTS. 2002. CD-ROM. MADISON, WI.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Equine property owners represent a growing audience in New Jersey that requests information on pasture management. A 29 multi-choice question survey was mailed in January 2000 to assess current pasture management practices. A response rate of 72% (n = 449) was achieved. Sixty-nine percent of respondents have less than 21 horses, 15% owned 21 to 35 horses, and 16% had greater than 35. Nearly 72% have less than 21 acres of pasture. Nineteen percent indicated Cooperative Extension is one source they use for pasture management information, while only 18% stated it is their primary source. Soil testing is used by 64%, and 95% apply limestone and 94% apply fertilizer, but only 28% are basing these application rates on soil test recommendations. Approximately 89% mow and 64% drag their pastures, and 54% report practicing some form of rotational grazing. One-third use manure on their farm but only 3% use manure testing to determine nutrient content. Sixteen percent stockpile manure, 13% compost it, and 33% sell, give away or dispose of manure through trash removal. Most of the survey respondents do not have access to or own the equipment needed for good pasture maintenance and management.