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Title: ETIOLOGY OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA: RESULTS FROM A MULTICENTRE CANADIAN STUDY (FOR THE CANADIAN ASSOC. FOR CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES, EDMONTON, ALBERTA, CANADA, OCT. 31-NOV. 4, 1999)

Author
item PEELING, R
item MARRIE, T
item ARTSOB, H
item DECARLOS, E
item Andersen, Arthur
item DILLON, E
item DICK, D

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/29/1999
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Objective: To determine the importance of chlamydia species and Hantavirus infection as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Canada. Methods: From January 1996 to September 1997, 853 patients with CAP were recruited from 15 tertiary care centres throughout Canada. Serum samples were tested fro antibodies to Chlamydia pneumonia (Cpn), C. pecorum, avian, ,feline, pigeon and turkey strains of C. psittaci using the microimmuno- fluorescence assay, and to Hantavirus using an enzyme immunoassay. Results: Of the 554 sera available, 42 (7.6%) met our criteria for recent Cpn infection (4-fold rise in IgG in 4 patients, IgM.>/=16 in 7, and IgG>/=512 in 31). Two (0.3%) patients had acute infection due to the feline strain of C. psittaci. None of the patients had antibodies to C. pecorum or Hantavirus. A comparison of the 42 patients with Cpn with those who did not have this infection revealed no features unique to Cpn. Over 50% (22/38) of patients with Cpn infection also had a co-pathogen demonstrated, the majority of which was S. pneumoniae. The site specific rates for Cpn ranged from 0-14.5%. Conclusions: Cpn is an important cause of CAP. Feline C. psittaci can cause pneumonia in humans. Cpn is a co-pathogen in the majority of instances in which it is implicated in CAP.