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Title: ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TEMPERATURE AND VINE DECLINES CAUSED BY ACREMONIUM CUCURBITACEARUM AND MONOSPORASCUS CANNONBALLUS ON MUSKMELON

Author
item Bruton, Benny
item Garcia-jimenez, J.
item Armengol, J.

Submitted to: Subtropical Plant Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/9/1999
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Temperature plays a major role in the incidence and severity of many plant diseases. Susceptibility of melon roots to infection and/or disease development varies with age of the plant as well as with changing environmental factors. It has been suggested that temperature exerts considerable influence on the muskmelon vine declines caused by Acremonium cucurbitacearum and Monosporascus cannonballus. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum temperature for growth as well as the temperature range for growth of the two pathogens. In addition, temperature data from locations where the two fungi occur were compiled to determine the possible relationship to disease incidence. A. cucurbitacearum had a growth optimum at 25 C and the disease is associated more with cooler climates as compared to M. cannonballus. M. cannonballus had a growth optimum of 30 C and may have a threshold soil temperature requirement for the development of severe vine decline. Mean daily maximu and minimum temperatures of >35/20 C near the end of the growing season appear to be associated with vine decline caused by M. cannonballus. In contrast, temperatures of <30/20 C near the end of the growing season appear to be more conducive to development of vine decline caused by A. cucurbitacearum. Thermal requirements may be one of the key factors determining the compatibility of species in different environments and thus their distributions. Preliminary evidence suggests that temperatures in melon production areas where A. cucurbitacearum and M. cannonballus are present may exert a great deal of influence on the development of vine decline. In the future, it may be possible to predict what melon production areas may be affected by the two soilborne pathogens.

Technical Abstract: Temperature plays a major role in the incidence and severity of many plant diseases. It has been proposed that temperature exerts considerable influence on the development of some muskmelon vine declines. A. cucurbitacearum has a growth optimum at 25 C and the disease is associated more with cooler climates as compared to M. cannonballus. M. cannonballus had a growth optimum of 30 C and may have a threshold soil temperature requirement for the development of severe vine decline. Mean minimum and maximum daily temperatures of >35/20 C day/night temperatures near the end of the growing season appear to be associated with vine decline caused by M. cannonballus. In contrast, temperatures of <30/20 C near the end of the growing season appear to be more conducive to development of vine decline caused by A. cucurbitacearum. Preliminary evidence suggests that temperatures in melon production areas where A. cucurbitacearum and M. cannonballus are present may exert a great deal of influence on the development of vine decline.