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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Methods and Application of Food Composition Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #384890

Research Project: USDA National Nutrient Databank for Food Composition

Location: Methods and Application of Food Composition Laboratory

Title: Current knowledge and challenges on the development of a dietary glucosinolate database in the U.S.

Author
item Wu, Xianli
item Pehrsson, Pamela

Submitted to: Current Developments in Nutrition
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/15/2021
Publication Date: 7/23/2021
Citation: Wu, X., Pehrsson, P.R. 2021. Current knowledge and challenges on the development of a dietary glucosinolate database in the U.S.. Current Developments in Nutrition. 5:nzab102. https://doi.org/10.1093/cdn/nzab102.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/cdn/nzab102

Interpretive Summary: Glucosinolates (GSLs) are a group of important cancer chemopreventive compounds found in same widely consumed vegetables in the world, such as broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower. The primary goals of this study were to summarize the current knowledge and discuss the challenges on the development of a dietary GSL database for US foods. A systematic literature search was conducted for the period 1980-2020. The results suggested that the studies on GSLs in commonly consumed vegetables is quite limited, and some data may be outdated. Current available data are not sufficient to develop a valid GSL database in the US; more comprehensive studies are needed especially for the understudied foods. Since the intake of GSLs may not correlate with their actual bioactive forms in human body, precautions must be taken when applying dietary intake of GSL calculated based on the GSL database or dataset in nutritional epidemiologic research.

Technical Abstract: Glucosinolates (GSLs) are a group of important cancer chemopreventive sulfur-containing compounds found primarily in the genus Brassica of Brassicaceae family. Certain GSL-containing plants, such as broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower, are among the most commonly consumed vegetables in the world. The primary goals of this study were to summarize the current knowledge and discuss the challenges on the development of a dietary GSL database for US foods. A systematic literature search was conducted for the period 1980-2020. Thirty papers were found to meet all inclusion and exclusion criteria; 27 GSLs were reported in 16 different vegetables, included 19 aliphatic, 4 aromatic and 4 indole GSLs. GSLs identified and quantified ranged from 3 for winter cress to 16 for cabbage. The number of publications for each food is unequal. GSLs of 11 vegetable were only reported in 1-2 studies, which certainly did not reflect the variations of their concentrations. The experimental designs of all 30 studies generally did not take into full consideration of the factors related to data quality. Enormous variations in the profiles and values of GSLs are observed between different vegetables and different cultivars/genotypes and growing conditions in the same vegetables. Genetic and environmental factors, as well as analytical method, are some of the key influential factors. In conclusion, the studies on GSLs in commonly consumed vegetables is quite limited, and some data may be outdated. Current available data are not sufficient to develop a valid GSL database in the US; more comprehensive studies are needed especially for the understudied foods. Since the intake of GSLs may not correlate with their actual bioactive forms in vivo, precautions must be taken when applying dietary intake of GSL calculated based on the GSL database or dataset in nutritional epidemiologic research.