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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #361950

Research Project: Novel Pre-harvest Interventions and Alternatives to Antibiotics to Reduce Foodborne Pathogens

Location: Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research

Title: Development of neutralizing buffered peptone water for salmonella verification testing in commercial poultry processing facilities

Author
item Hinton, Jr, Arthur
item Gamble, Gary
item Berrang, Mark
item Buhr, Richard - Jeff
item JOHNSTON, JOHN - Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS)

Submitted to: Journal of Food: Microbiology, Safety, and Hygiene
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/4/2019
Publication Date: 6/11/2019
Citation: Hinton Jr, A., Gamble, G.R., Berrang, M.E., Buhr, R.J., Johnston, J.J. 2019. Development of neutralizing buffered peptone water for salmonella verification testing in commercial poultry processing facilities. Journal of Food: Microbiology, Safety, and Hygiene. 10:359.

Interpretive Summary: The Food Safety Inspection Service monitors commercially produced poultry meat for the level of contamination by Salmonella. However, residual concentrations of chemical sanitizers on processed meat can potentially produce “false negative” test results. To alleviate this problem scientist from the Agricultural Research Service developed Neutralizing Buffered Peptone Water. The product is now produced commercially and is required to be used in Salmonella verification testing by all commercial poultry processors in the U.S.

Technical Abstract: Wholesome poultry meat contaminated by foodborne pathogens is a major source of human foodborne illnesses. Salmonella is one of the main pathogens associated with contaminated poultry, and this pathogen has been estimated to cause over 1 million cases of foodborne illness and over 5 thousand deaths in the U.S. each year. In order to reduce bacterial contamination of processed poultry, processors typically apply chemical sanitizers to poultry meat during various processing operations. The most commonly used sanitizers include acid mixtures; acidified sodium chlorite (ASC); cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC); 1,3-dibromo-5,5-dimethylhydantion (DBDMH); and peroxyacetic acid (PAA). The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) is responsible for monitoring commercially produced poultry meat for the level of contamination by harmful bacteria, such as Salmonella. FSIS became concerned that residual concentrations of chemical sanitizers used by commercial processors might remain on processed meat after food safety experts became aware of new research that was conducted in this area (6). The research indicated that there was the potential that residual concentrations of sanitizers on processed poultry could be carried-over into verification test samples. The carry-over of sanitizers into the test samples might then produce “false negative” results because Salmonella present on the chicken meat could be killed by sanitizers in the samples and then not be detected by verification testing.