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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #360786

Research Project: Production and Processing Intervention Strategies for Poultry Associated Foodborne Pathogens

Location: Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research

Title: Recovery of salmonella and campylobacter in various concentrations of cetylpyridinium chloride

Author
item Cosby, Douglas
item Gamble, Gary
item Cox, Nelson - Nac
item Mize, Susan
item Berrang, Mark
item Hinton, Jr, Arthur

Submitted to: Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/20/2018
Publication Date: 7/23/2018
Citation: Cosby, D.E., Gamble, G.R., Cox Jr, N.A., Mize, S.C., Berrang, M.E., Hinton Jr, A. 2018. Recovery of salmonella and campylobacter in various concentrations of cetylpyridinium chloride. Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract. 97(E-Suppl.1):207.

Interpretive Summary: n/a

Technical Abstract: Use of biocides in U.S. poultry processing plants has become a matter of concern with regards to recovery of human enteropathogens from carcass rinses collected for regulatory analysis. Cetylpryridinium chloride (CPC) is one of the most prevalent biocides being used in the processing plant to reduce Salmonella and Campylobacter. This study evaluated the recovery of Salmonella and Campylobacter species from overnight storage in 1:2 serial dilutions of CPC (1000 to 0.49 ppm) at 4oC. Eleven Campylobacter cultures (5 – C. jejuni and 6 – C. coli) commonly isolated from poultry were grown on Campylobacter-CEFEX (CEFEX) agar plates at 42oC for 48 h under microaerobic conditions and 10 Salmonella serotypes (commonly isolated from poultry) were grown on brilliant green sulfa (BGS) plates overnight at 37oC before each replication. Serial dilutions of CPC and propylene glycol (PG) were prepared in plastic 24-well tissue culture plates containing buffered peptone water (BPW). An average of 107 colony forming units (cfu) of each enteropathogen was added to each well. Inoculated plates were stored in plastic zip lock bags overnight at 4oC. After overnight storage, 10 µL of the stored broth was streaked for isolation onto CEFEX agar plates for Campylobacter and onto BGS agar plates for Salmonella. CEFEX plates were incubated at 42oC for 48 h under microaerobic conditions and BGS plates were incubated at 37oC for 24 h, the cfu were enumerated. Five replications were conducted on separate days. Salmonella serotypes chosen for use in this study were susceptible to very low concentrations of CPC; growth was detected only at 2 ppm or lower. Campylobacter strains were similar in susceptibility with growth recorded at 7.8 ppm or lower. These data indicate that residual CPC which may remain attached to the carcass after processing may adversely affect recovery of Salmonella and Campylobacter species from carcass rinses used by regulatory agencies to determine the safety of processed poultry products and may result in negative observations and provide a false sense of security to consumers.