Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #353162

Research Project: Production and Processing Intervention Strategies for Poultry Associated Foodborne Pathogens

Location: Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research

Title: Colonization of day-old broilers with Salmonella Typhimurium or Campylobacter coli through various routes of inoculation

Author
item Cox, Nelson - Nac
item Berrang, Mark
item Cosby, Douglas
item HARRISON, MARK - University Of Georgia
item WILSON, JEANNA - University Of Georgia
item Hinton, Jr, Arthur

Submitted to: Poultry USA
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/1/2018
Publication Date: 8/1/2018
Citation: Cox Jr, N.A., Berrang, M.E., Cosby, D.E., Harrison, M.A., Wilson, J.L., Hinton Jr, A. 2018. Colonization of day-old broilers with Salmonella Typhimurium or Campylobacter coli through various routes of inoculation. Poultry USA. pp. 48-49.

Interpretive Summary: none

Technical Abstract: The newly hatched chick may be exposed to significant levels of Salmonella and Campylobacter early in life from an assortment of sources such as the hatching cabinet, hatchery environment and the broiler house. Once these bacteria reach the ceca of a young chick, they can multiply to high numbers in a relatively short period of time. Then the chick will excrete large numbers of Salmonella and Campylobacter in its droppings which will result in the contamination of other birds in the broiler house. In these studies, these microbes were introduced into the day-of-hatch chick through and assortment of body openings to determine which, if any, would result in the production of seeder birds. The data clearly demonstrates that seeder birds excreting high numbers of Salmonella and Campylobacter can result from contamination introduced through various body openings (mouth, cloaca, eye). This emphasizes the need to control these human foodborne enteropathogens in the breeder flocks, hatcheries and broiler houses.