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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » ESQRU » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352530

Research Project: Evaluation of Management of Laying Hens and Housing Systems to Control Salmonella and Other Pathogenic Infections, Egg Contamination, and Product Quality

Location: ESQRU

Title: Identifying and responding to factors that can affect egg quality and appearance

Author
item ANDERSON, KENNETH - North Carolina State University
item Jones, Deana
item KARCHER, DARRIN - Purdue University

Submitted to: Extension Publications
Publication Type: Research Technical Update
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/1/2017
Publication Date: 7/1/2017
Citation: Anderson, K., Jones, D.R., Karcher, D.M. 2017. Identifying and responding to factors that can affect egg quality and appearance. North Carolina State Extension Publications. AG-169.https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/factors that can affect egg quality and appearance.

Interpretive Summary: Many factors can influence egg quality and appearance. These factors will vary depending upon the housing environment, genetics, drugs, feed ingredients, or chemicals used in agriculture. As egg production methods become more varied—for example, changing from cage to free range—and as layer strains are selected for the environment and hens age, the number of defects in eggs is increasing. The emphasis on locally produced food in the “slow food movement” also has changed what the hens are exposed to and made the way they are handled increasingly variable. It is important for producers to understand what may cause certain egg defects and to provide a solution in their production system.

Technical Abstract: Many factors can influence egg quality and appearance. These factors will vary depending upon the housing environment, genetics, drugs, feed ingredients, or chemicals used in agriculture. As egg production methods become more varied—for example, changing from cage to free range—and as layer strains are selected for the environment and hens age, the number of defects in eggs is increasing. The emphasis on locally produced food in the “slow food movement” also has changed what the hens are exposed to and made the way they are handled increasingly variable. It is important for producers to understand what may cause certain egg defects and to provide a solution in their production system.