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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #339549

Research Project: Production and Processing Intervention Strategies for Poultry Associated Foodborne Pathogens

Location: Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research

Title: Evaluation of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) on water usage and salmonella retention in broilers following feed and water withdrawal

Author
item HARRIS, CAITLIN - University Of Georgia
item Bartenfeld Josselson, Lydia
item BOURASSA, DIANNA - Auburn University
item FAIRCHILD, BRIAN - University Of Georgia
item KIEPPER, BRIAN - University Of Georgia
item Buhr, Richard - Jeff

Submitted to: Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/15/2017
Publication Date: 7/17/2017
Citation: Harris, C.E., Bartenfeld, L.N., Bourassa, D.V., Fairchild, B.D., Kiepper, B.H., Buhr, R.J. 2017. Evaluation of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) on water usage and salmonella retention in broilers following feed and water withdrawal [abstract]. Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract. 96(1):63. p. 23.

Interpretive Summary: none

Technical Abstract: The effect of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) on water consumption and Salmonella retention in the crops and ceca of broilers following feed and water withdrawal was evaluated as a potential preharvest Salmonella intervention. For trial 1, 35 d old broilers were challenged with 1.0 mL of 10^8 Salmonella Typhimurium marker strain and placed into 6 pens (12 broilers per pen, 72 total), provided feed and water ab libitum, and were on a 24 h light period. 72 h post challenge, 3 pens were connected to carboys containing water with 500 ppm CPC, while the remaining pens were connected to carboys containing tap water. Water usage was measured for 48 h until termination of the experiment. The pens (1 treated and 1 untreated) were assigned to one of the following feed/water withdrawal times: 0 h feed/ 0h water withdrawal (full fed), 6 h feed/ 0h water withdrawal, or 12 h feed/ 6 h water withdrawal. After feed/water withdrawal, broilers were euthanized and crops and ceca were aseptically collected for microbiological analysis. For this trial, there were no significant differences in Salmonella recovery from the crop (94% positive) or ceca (92% positive) between the CPC treatment and control groups, or among the feed and water withdrawal time periods. For trial 2, the feed consumption and water usage of broilers given varied concentrations (0, 100, 250, or 500 ppm) of CPC in the water was evaluated in 2 replicates per treatment. Pens contained 46 d old broilers that were provided feed and water ab libitum and were on a 24 h light period (10 birds per pen, 80 total). Each drinker line was connected to a carboy containing water with one of the 4 treatments. The carboys and feeders were weighed at the beginning and end of the 96 h trial. The broiler water usage and feed consumption markedly decreased as CPC concentration increased. The feed consumption of broilers given 100, 250, and 500 ppm CPC decreased 36, 57, and 71% respectively and the water use decreased 38, 62, and 72% respectively compared to the control value. The effect of CPC on Salmonella retention in the crop and ceca was not effectively determined due to decreased water consumption. Lower concentrations of CPC are to be evaluated in a second Salmonella challenge following feed and water withdrawal.