Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » ESQRU » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #336971

Research Project: Evaluation of Management of Laying Hens and Housing Systems to Control Salmonella and Other Pathogenic Infections, Egg Contamination, and Product Quality

Location: ESQRU

Title: Review of egg-related salmonellosis and reduction strategies

Author
item CHOUSALKER, KAPIL - University Of Adelaide
item Gast, Richard
item MARTELLI, FRANCESCA - Animal & Plant Health Agency Apha
item SOBOLEVA, TANAYA - Ministry For Primary Industries
item PANDE, VIVEK - University Of Adelaide

Submitted to: Critical Reviews in Microbiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/15/2017
Publication Date: 4/1/2018
Citation: Chousalker, K., Gast, R.K., Martelli, F., Soboleva, T., Pande, V. 2018. Review of egg-related salmonellosis and reduction strategies. Critical Reviews in Microbiology. 44:290-293.

Interpretive Summary: Globally, Salmonella is one of the most commonly reported causes of foodborne illness in humans. Contaminated food products of animal origin, particularly egg and egg products are frequently implicated in outbreaks of human salmonellosis. Salmonella Enteritidis is often involved in egg and egg products-associated foodborne outbreaks in the USA and UK. However, in Australia and New Zealand human infections caused by this serovar occur mostly as a result of infection acquired while overseas, with S. Typhimurium being a predominant cause of local foodborne outbreaks linked to consumption of egg and egg products. In this paper, an overview of Salmonella epidemiology on laying farms, egg-related Salmonella outbreaks in humans, disease reporting systems, and regulatory practices to control Salmonella in the USA, UK, Australia, and New Zealand is provided. Considering the estimated production of eggs in the USA, UK, Australia and New Zealand in 2015, the risk of foodborne illness in general is quite low for humans consuming eggs. Salmonella diagnostics, reporting and surveillance systems have improved over the years and will continue to improve in the years to come. However, given the number of different emerging Salmonella serovars, a review of Salmonella control strategies from farm to fork is required at this time.

Technical Abstract: Globally, Salmonella Enterica subsp. enterica is one of the most commonly reported causes of foodborne illness in humans. Contaminated food products of animal origin, particularly egg and egg products are frequently implicated in outbreaks of human salmonellosis. Salmonella Enteritidis is frequently involved in egg and egg products-associated foodborne outbreaks in the USA and UK. However, in Australia and New Zealand human infections caused by this serovar occur as a result of infection acquired while overseas, with S. Typhimurium being a predominant cause of local foodborne outbreaks linked to consumption of egg and egg products. In this paper, an overview of Salmonella epidemiology on laying farms, egg-related Salmonella outbreaks in humans, disease reporting systems, and regulatory practices to control Salmonella across USA, UK, Australia, and New Zealand is provided. Considering the estimated production of eggs in the USA, UK, Australia and New Zealand in 2015, the risk of foodborne illness in general is quite low for humans consuming eggs. Salmonella diagnostics, reporting and surveillance systems have improved over the years and will continue to improve in the years to come. However, given the number of different emerging Salmonella serovars a regular review of Salmonella control strategies from farm to fork is required.