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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #326415

Research Project: Pathogen Reduction and Processing Parameters in Poultry Processing Systems

Location: Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research

Title: Inhibition of salmonella by cecal bacteria in media supplemented with lactate and succinate

Author
item Hinton, Jr, Arthur
item Ingram, Kimberly - Kim

Submitted to: World Poultry Congress Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/24/2016
Publication Date: 9/9/2016
Citation: Hinton Jr, A., Ingram, K.D. 2016. Inhibition of salmonella by cecal bacteria in media supplemented with lactate and succinate. World Poultry Congress Proceedings. S217.

Interpretive Summary: none

Technical Abstract: Experiments were conducted to examine the ability of cecal cultures from broilers to inhibit growth of Salmonella Typhimurium in vitro. Cecal contents from commercial broilers were combined, and 0.1 ml of the cecal slurry was added to media containing (g/l), tryptose, 10; yeast extract, 5; sodium chloride, 5; beef extract, 2; and glucose, 2. Inoculated media was incubated aerobically at 37oC for 48 h. Supplemented media was prepared by adding 0, 50, 100, or 150 mM of sodium lactate and sodium succinate to fresh media. Supplemented media was inoculated with 105 cfu/ml of cecal culture, only; 104 cfu/ml of a nalidixic acid resistant Salmonella, only; or the cecal culture and Salmonella. Inoculated media were incubated aerobically at 37oC for14 days. After incubation, Salmonella and cecal bacteria (aerobes and anaerobes) were enumerated in each media. Cecal bacteria were also isolated and then identified with the Biolog Microbial Identification System. Results indicated that there was no significant difference in the number of cecal bacteria recovered from any media inoculated with cecal cultures only or with cecal cultures and Salmonella. However, significantly (p < 0.05) fewer Salmonella were recovered from media inoculated with cecal cultures and Salmonella than from media inoculated with Salmonella only in media supplemented with 50, 100, or 150 mM lactate and succinate. There was no significant difference in the number of Salmonella recovered from media that was not supplemented with lactate and succinate. Aerobic cecal isolates included Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Corynebacterium amycolatum, while anaerobic isolates included Lactobacillus spp., Lactococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. Findings indicated that cecal cultures from broilers possess anti-Salmonella activity related to the ability of the cultures to metabolize lactate and succinate. This information may be beneficial in formulating effective, defined probiotic cultures.