Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #316976

Research Project: INTERVENTION STRATEGIES FOR FOODBORNE PATHOGENS DURING POULTRY PRODUCTION AND PROCESSING

Location: Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research

Title: Managing the gut microbiome of food animals with tools of microbial ecology

Author
item OAKLEY, BRIAN - Former ARS Employee
item Kogut, Michael - Mike
item Donovan, David
item Cox, Nelson - Nac
item Berrang, Mark
item CHALGHOUMI, RAJA - University Of Carthage, Tunisia
item SEAL, BRUCE - Former ARS Employee

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/25/2015
Publication Date: 6/23/2015
Citation: Oakley, B., Kogut, M.H., Donovan, D.M., Cox Jr, N.A., Berrang, M.E., Chalghoumi, R., Seal, B. 2015. Managing the gut microbiome of food animals with tools of microbial ecology [abstract]. International Scientific Conference on Probiotics and Prebiotics. June 23-25, 2015. Budapest, Hungary.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The removal of antibiotics from animal feed as mandated by the European Union in 2006 and recently proposed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will require new strategies to maintain animal health, optimize nutrition, and control foodborne pathogens. We have recently pursued three main approaches to managing the GI microbiome of poultry with potential application to other food animals. First, we have documented the taxonomic composition and diversity of naturally occurring bacterial communities through the life span of a commercial broiler. Second, we have begun to use these data to inform cultivation efforts with the goal of assembling probiotic consortia to mimic the natural community. Finally, genome sequencing of novel bacteria isolated from the chicken GI tract has been used to identify endolysins of bacteriophage origin that may be used as targeted antimicrobials against specific animal or human pathogens.