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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #315011

Research Project: INTERVENTION STRATEGIES FOR FOODBORNE PATHOGENS DURING POULTRY PRODUCTION AND PROCESSING

Location: Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research

Title: Comparison of two commercially available rapid detection methods and a conventional culture method to detect naturally occurring salmonellae on broiler carcasses

Author
item Cosby, Douglas
item Cox, Nelson - Nac
item Berrang, Mark
item House, Sandra
item Frye, Jonathan
item Jackson, Charlene

Submitted to: Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/3/2015
Publication Date: 7/27/2015
Citation: Cosby, D.E., Cox Jr, N.A., Berrang, M.E., House, S.L., Frye, J.G., Jackson, C.R. 2015. Comparison of two commercially available rapid detection methods and a conventional culture method to detect naturally occurring salmonellae on broiler carcasses. Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract. July 27-30, 2015. Louisville, Kentucky.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Many different screening devices and sampling methods have been used to detect the presence of naturally occurring Salmonella on commercially processed broiler carcasses. The objective of this study was to compare two commercial screening systems (BAX® and Roka®) to a standard cultural procedure used by industry and government laboratories. On each of 5 replicate sampling days (5 flocks), 8 broiler carcasses were collected after chilling from a commercial broiler plant. Each carcass was rinsed with 400 mL of 1% buffered peptone water (BPW) for 60 s using an automated shaking machine. A 30 mL aliquot was removed and incubated at 35oC for 24 h. After incubation, pre-determined aliquots of the 30 mL BPW were inoculated into the BAX® and Roka® instruments (according to the manufacturer’s protocol); 0.1 mL and 0.5 mL aliquots (respectively) were also inoculated into tetrathionate (TT (Hajna)) and Rappaport-Vassiliadis (RV) broths which were incubated at 42oC for 24 h. Following incubation, aliquots from the two broths were streaked for isolation onto Xylose-Lysine-Tergitol 4 and Brilliant Green Sulfa agar plates and incubated at 35oC for 24 h. One typical Salmonella-like colony from each of the four plates was selected and screened biochemically and confirmed as Salmonella by serological methods. The BAX®, which is a PCR amplification system, and the Roka®, which uses the Atlas® System to target the ribosomal RNA, both detected the same positive samples as the conventional methodology. Four of 40 samples were positive for Salmonella with no false positives or false negatives detected from either automated systems. Both rapid methods tested in this study were equally as effective as the more laborious and time-consuming conventional cultural procedure.