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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENHANCING SUSTAINABILITY OF FOOD PRODUCTION SYSTEMS IN THE NORTHEAST

Location: New England Plant, Soil and Water Research Laboratory

Title: Comparison of soil phosphorus status and organic matter composition in potato fields with different crop rotation systems)

Author
item He, Zhongqi
item Honeycutt, C wayne
item Olanya, Modesto
item Larkin, Robert - bob
item Halloran, John
item Frantz, Jonathan

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/1/2011
Publication Date: 5/31/2012
Citation: He, Z., Honeycutt, C., Olanya, O.M., Larkin, R.P., Halloran, J.M., Frantz, J. 2012. Comparison of soil phosphorus status and organic matter composition in potato fields with different crop rotation systems. In: He, Z., Larkin, R.P., Honeycutt, C.W., editors. Sustainable Potato Production: Global Case Studies. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Springer. 61-79.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Cropping management practices influence soil phosphorus (P) availability and soil organic matter (SOM) quality. This chapter summarizes the impact of cropping systems and water management on soil phosphorus status and organic matter characteristics after the first full cycle of the 3-y crop rotations. These data indicated that the 3-yr crop rotations impacted more on labile P and organic matter fractions and relevant biochemical parameters (i.e. water extractable P and organic matter, mild modified Morgan soil test P, microbial biomass C and P, phosphatase and urease activities). However, these influences were not always consistent and statistically significant (P=0.1 or 0.05). Generally, irrigation had a greater influence on stable P and organic matter fractions than crop rotations. Continuous analysis of P and SOM from soils after the completion of the second rotation cycle of the 3-yr crop rotations would provide more insights on the improvement of soil fertility and biochemical quality for potato production by crop rotations.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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