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ARS Home » Plains Area » Manhattan, Kansas » Center for Grain and Animal Health Research » Stored Product Insect and Engineering Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #378085

Research Project: Impacting Quality through Preservation, Enhancement, and Measurement of Grain and Plant Traits

Location: Stored Product Insect and Engineering Research

Title: Ability of near-infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics to predict the age of mosquitoes reared under different conditions

Author
item ONG, OSELYNE T. - QIMR BERGHOFER MEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
item KHO, ELISE - UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND
item ESPERANCA, PEDRO - IMPERIAL COLLEGE
item Dowell, Floyd
item DEVINE, GREGOR - QIMR BERGHOFER MEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
item CHURCHER, THOMAS - IMPERIAL COLLEGE

Submitted to: Parasites & Vectors
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/24/2020
Publication Date: 3/30/2020
Citation: Ong, O.W., Kho, E.A., Esperanca, P.M., Freebairn, C., Dowell, F.E., Devine, G.J., Churcher, T.S. 2020. Ability of near-infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics to predict the age of mosquitoes reared under different conditions. Parasites & Vectors. 13:160. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-020-04031-3.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-020-04031-3

Interpretive Summary: Quantifying the average age of a mosquito population would provide cost-effective and compelling evidence for the potential impacts of controlling insects that transmit human and animal diseases. We investigated whether near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) models derived from the laboratory strain of mosquitoes can be used to predict the age of mosquitoes grown from pupae collected in the field. Models trained on spectra from laboratory-reared material were able to predict the age of other laboratory reared mosquitoes with moderate accuracy and successfully differentiated all day 2 and 15 mosquitoes, though they were unable to predict age of field-derived mosquitoes. This study suggests that laboratory-reared mosquitoes do not capture enough environmental variation to accurately predict the age of the same species reared under different conditions. Further research is needed to explore alternative pre-processing methods and machine learning techniques, and to understand factors that affect absorbance in mosquitoes before field application using NIRS.

Technical Abstract: Practical, field-ready age-grading tools for mosquito vectors of disease are urgently needed because of the impact that daily survival has on vectorial capacity. Previous studies have shown that near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), in combination with chemometrics and predictive modeling, can forecast the age of laboratory-reared mosquitoes with moderate to high accuracy. It remains unclear whether the technique has utility for identifying shifts in the age structure of wild-caught mosquitoes. Here we investigate whether models derived from the laboratory strain of mosquitoes can be used to predict the age of mosquitoes grown from pupae collected in the field. NIRS data from adult female Aedes albopictus mosquitoes reared in the laboratory (2, 5, 8, 12 and 15 days old) were analysed against spectra from mosquitoes emerging from wild-caught pupae (1, 7 and 14 days-old). Different partial least squares (PLS) regression methods trained on spectra from laboratory mosquitoes were evaluated on their ability to predict the age of mosquitoes from more natural environments. Models trained on spectra from laboratory-reared material were able to predict the age of other laboratory reared mosquitoes with moderate accuracy and successfully differentiated all day 2 and 15 mosquitoes. Models derived with laboratory mosquitoes could not differentiate between field-derived age groups, with age predictions relatively indistinguishable for day 1–14. Pre-processing of spectral data and improving the PLS regression framework to avoid overfitting can increase accuracy, but predictions of mosquitoes reared in different environments remained poor. Principal components analysis confirms substantial spectral variations between laboratory and field-derived mosquitoes despite both originating from the same island population. Models trained on laboratory mosquitoes were able to predict ages of laboratory mosquitoes with good sensitivity and specificity though they were unable to predict age of field-derived mosquitoes. This study suggests that laboratory-reared mosquitoes do not capture enough environmental variation to accurately predict the age of the same species reared under different conditions. Further research is needed to explore alternative pre-processing methods and machine learning techniques, and to understand factors that affect absorbance in mosquitoes before field application using NIRS.