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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Methods and Application of Food Composition Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #370579

Research Project: Advanced Technology for Rapid Comprehensive Analysis of the Chemical Components

Location: Methods and Application of Food Composition Laboratory

Title: Analysis of Cranberry Proanthocyanidins Using UPLC - Ion Mobility - High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

Author
item WANG, YIFEI - OHIO UNIVERSITY
item HARRIGNTON, PETER DE - OHIO UNIVERSITY
item CHANG, TONY - INTERNATIONAL CHEMISTRY TESTING
item Wu, Xianli
item Chen, Pei

Submitted to: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/13/2020
Publication Date: 4/22/2020
Citation: Wang, Y., Harrington, P.B., Chang, T., Wu, X., Chen, P. 2020. Analysis of cranberry proanthocyanidins using UPLC - ion mobility - high resolution mass spectrometry. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry. 412:3653-3662. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00216-020-02601-z.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00216-020-02601-z

Interpretive Summary: Cranberry proanthocyanidin oligomers were investigated using ultra performance liquid chromatography - ion mobility - high-resolution mass spectrometry (UPLC-IM-HRMS). A total of 304 individual A-type and B-type proanthocyanidins, including 40 trimers, 68 tetramers, 53 pentamers, 54 hexamers, 49 heptamers, 28 octamers, and 12 nonamers, were characterized.. Incorporation of ion mobility into HRMS proved to be of great value to the characterization and analysis of proanthocyanidins from complex sample matrix

Technical Abstract: Cranberry proanthocyanidin oligomers were investigated using ultra performance liquid chromatography - ion mobility - high-resolution mass spectrometry (UPLC-IM-HRMS). A total of 304 individual A-type and B-type proanthocyanidins, including 40 trimers, 68 tetramers, 53 pentamers, 54 hexamers, 49 heptamers, 28 octamers, and 12 nonamers, were characterized. A-type proanthocyanidins appeared to dominate the cranberry proanthocyanidins. As degree-of-polymerization increased, the abundance of molecules with multiple A-type double inter-flavan linkage or having doubly charged ions also increased. Under the same charge state, the drift times of proanthocyanidin ions increased together with their degree-of-polymerization or the number of double inter-flavan linkages. For the same proanthocyanidin molecules, doubly-charged ions had shorter drift times compared to their singly-charged counterparts, which lead to separated trendlines in the ion mobility-mass plot. While consistent ion mobility was observed for most proanthocyanidins with the same degree-of-polymerization, coeluted isomeric ions of trimer and tetramer were detected by their unique drift times. Incorporation of ion mobility into HRMS proved to be of great value to characterize and analyze proanthocyanidins from complex sample matrices.