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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Citrus and Other Subtropical Products Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #349483

Research Project: Quality, Shelf-life and Health Benefits for Fresh, Fresh-cut and Processed Products for Citrus and Other Tropical/Subtropical-grown Fruits and Vegetables

Location: Citrus and Other Subtropical Products Research

Title: Difference in volatile composition between the pericarp tissue and inner tissue of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit

Author
item Wang, Libin - Nanjing Agricultural University
item Chunlu, Qian - Yangzhou University
item Bai, Jinhe
item Luo, Weiqi - North Carolina State University
item Jin, Changhai - Yangzhou University
item Yu, Zhifang - Nanjing Agricultural University

Submitted to: Journal of Food Processing and Preservation
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/5/2017
Publication Date: 1/1/2018
Citation: Wang, L., Chunlu, Q., Bai, J., Luo, W., Jin, C., Yu, Z. 2018. Difference in volatile composition between the pericarp tissue and inner tissue of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit. Journal of Food Processing and Preservation. 42(1):e13387. https://doi.org/10.1111/jfpp.13387.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/jfpp.13387

Interpretive Summary: The information on the volatile profile for the inner tissues versus the peel and its contribution to tomato aroma is still rudimentary. In this study, the pericarp and inner tissue were separated from three tomato cultivars of different genetic backgrounds, and the volatile compositions were analyzed with HS-SPME-GC-MS. The results provided a basic standard to compare the volatile data obtained from whole fruit verses pericarp tissues.

Technical Abstract: Numerous studies have reported the volatile profiles in the whole fruit or pericarp tissue of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit; however, information is limited on the volatile composition in the inner tissue and its contribution to tomato aroma. For this, the pericarps and inner tissues of “Moneymaker,” “UglyRipe,” and “FL 47” fruits were separated before volatile analysis. Results showed that the volatile profiles were quite similar between the pericarp and inner tissue, suggesting the inner tissues also have a contribution to overall aroma quality. Besides the difference in volatile profile among cultivars, a higher concentration of alcohols was observed in the inner tissues of tomato fruit in comparison with that in the pericarp, which was associated with higher levels of 3-methylbutanal, 2-methylbutanal, 3-methylbutanol, and 2-methylbutanol in the inner tissue. These results also imply that different sampling methods might impact tomato aroma quality, which needs further verification via sensory penal.