Skip to main content
ARS Home » Plains Area » Manhattan, Kansas » Center for Grain and Animal Health Research » Stored Product Insect and Engineering Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #344477

Research Project: Sustainable Management Strategies for Stored-Product Insects

Location: Stored Product Insect and Engineering Research

Title: Evaluation of pheromone-baited traps for the monitoring and management of nuisance problems associated with the invasive brown marmorated stink bug

Author
item Morrison Iii, William - Rob
item BERGH, J - Virginia Tech
item KUHAR, THOMAS - Virginia Tech
item WALGENBACK, JIM - North Carolina State University
item Leskey, Tracy

Submitted to: International Organization Biological Control/West Palearctic Reg. Section
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/17/2017
Publication Date: 2/19/2018
Citation: Morrison III, W.R., Bergh, J.C., Kuhar, T.P., Walgenback, J., Leskey, T.C. 2018. Evaluation of pheromone-baited traps for the monitoring and management of nuisance problems associated with the invasive brown marmorated stink bug. In: Trematerra, P., Trdan, S., editors. Proceedings of International Organization for Biological Control of Noxious Animals and Plants (IOBC)/West Palaeartic Regional Section (WPRS) Bulletin, July 2-5, 2017, Ljubljana, Slovenia. 130:116-122.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The brown marmorated stink bug, or Halyomorpha halys, is an invasive species from southeast Asia, and has caused extensive agricultural damage in North America and Europe. Pheromone-based technology has been developed over the past 10 years, and when combined with appropriate traps, is highly effective at monitoring the species from April to October. This species also causes enormous nuisance issues for homeowners, ports, and the shipping industry when adults overwinter in anthropogenic structures in the fall, and then emerge in the spring. It was unknown whether this same pheromone technology in similar but smaller traps was effective at monitoring and/or managing H. halys in the winter (diapause) and early spring (post-diapause) periods of the year (roughly January to June) inside anthropogenic structures. This report summarizes two years of research examining the ability of pheromone-baited small pyramid traps to monitor and manage H. halys nuisance issues in buildings in the mid-Atlantic US.