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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Citrus and Other Subtropical Products Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #343172

Research Project: Quality, Shelf-life and Health Benefits for Fresh, Fresh-cut and Processed Products for Citrus and Other Tropical/Subtropical-grown Fruits and Vegetables

Location: Citrus and Other Subtropical Products Research

Title: Residual impact of methyl salicylate fumigation at the breaker stage on C6 volatile biopathway in red tomato fruit

Author
item Wang, Libin - Yangzhou University
item Li, Xuehui - Nanyang Technological University
item Bai, Jinhe
item Luo, Haibo - Zhejiang University
item Jin, Chanhai - Yangzhou University
item Hui, Jie - Yangzhou University
item Yu, Zhifang - Nanjing Agricultural University

Submitted to: Journal of Food Processing and Preservation
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/25/2016
Publication Date: 12/1/2017
Citation: Wang, L., Li, X., Bai, J., Luo, H., Jin, C., Hui, J., Yu, Z. 2017. Residual impact of methyl salicylate fumigation at the breaker stage on C6 volatile biopathway in red tomato fruit. Journal of Food Processing and Preservation. 41:e13285. https://doi.org/10.1111/jfpp.13285.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/jfpp.13285

Interpretive Summary: Effects of methyl salicylate (MeSA) application on tomato stress responses and ripening processes have been researched intensely. However, less is studied on the impact of its application on the flavor development. We applied MeSA to 'FL 47’ tomato fruits at breaker stage and measured the volatile and non-volatile flavor compounds by the analytical methods, and electronic nose (e-nose) and tongue (e-tongue) as well. The results showed that although the productions of more than half volatile compounds were suppressed after MeSA fumigation associated with lower level of oxygen-containing heterocyclic compounds, E-nose could not discriminate the two samples based on their aroma components. On the other hand, analytical values of total soluble solids and titratable acid, along with e-tongue distinguished the two samples. These results indicated that MeSA fumigation at breaker stage impacted taste profile in tomato fruits.

Technical Abstract: Flavor, which is comprised of aroma and taste, is an important tomato characteristic. Methyl salicylate (MeSA), acting as a critical mobile signal, plays an important role in tomato stress responses and ripening processes. However, less is studied on the impact of its application at early ripening stage on tomato flavor development. In this study, after ethylene exposure, ‘FL 47’ tomato fruits at breaker stage were divided into two lots, fumigated with 0.05 mM MeSA or water control for 24 h before ripening at 20 °C. The results showed that although the productions of more than half volatile compounds were suppressed after MeSA fumigation associated with lower level of oxygen- containing heterocyclic compounds. Electronic nose (e-nose) could not discriminate the two samples based on their aroma components. On the other hand, the developments of total soluble solids (TSS) and titratable acid (TA) were suppressed after MeSA treatment, which was in agreement with the result of electronic tongue (e-tongue) which distinguished the two samples. These results indicated that MeSA fumigation at breaker stage impacted taste profile in tomato fruits.