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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Egg Safety & Quality Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #340980

Research Project: Reduction of Invasive Salmonella enterica in Poultry through Genomics, Phenomics and Field Investigations of Small Multi-Species Farm Environments

Location: Egg Safety & Quality Research

Title: Draft genome sequences of 64 Salmonella enterica subtype Enteritidis isolates obtained from wild mice.

Author
item Guard, Jean
item Cao, Guojie - Food And Drug Administration(FDA)
item Kastanis, George - Food And Drug Administration(FDA)
item Davison, Sherrill - University Of Pennsylvania
item Mcclelland, M - Food And Drug Administration(FDA)
item Leon, M - Food And Drug Administration(FDA)
item Zheng, J - Food And Drug Administration(FDA)
item Brown, E - Food And Drug Administration(FDA)
item Allard, Mark - Food And Drug Administration(FDA)

Submitted to: Genome Announcements
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/31/2017
Publication Date: 9/7/2017
Citation: Guard, J.Y., Cao, G., Kastanis, G., Davison, S., Mcclelland, M., Leon, M.S., Zheng, J., Brown, E., Allard, M. 2017. Draft genome sequences of 64 Salmonella enterica subtype Enteritidis isolates obtained from wild mice. Genome Announcements. 5(36):e00953-17.

Interpretive Summary: Salmonella Enteritidis is a foodborne pathogen of global concern because of the high frequency isolated from foods and patients. Draft genomes of 64 S. Enteritidis strains from intestines and spleens of mice were reported. The availability of these genomes provides useful information on genomic diversity and invasion capability of S. Enteritidis in Northeastern United States during a time when foodborne outbreaks traced to internal contamination of eggs was prevalent. This work was conducted via a Material Transfer Agreement between USDA and FDA (06-2016).

Technical Abstract: Salmonella Enteritidis is a foodborne pathogen of global concern because of the high frequency isolated from foods and patients. Draft genomes of 64 S. Enteritidis strains from intestines and spleens of mice were reported. The availability of these genomes provides useful information on genomic diversity and invasion capability of S. Enteritidis in Northeastern United States during a time when foodborne outbreaks traced to internal contamination of eggs was prevalent.