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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania » Eastern Regional Research Center » Molecular Characterization of Foodborne Pathogens Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #335253

Research Project: Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Biofilms and within Microbial Communities in Food

Location: Molecular Characterization of Foodborne Pathogens Research

Title: Whole-genome sequence of Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 strain PA20

Author
item Uhlich, Gaylen
item Paoli, George
item Zhang, Xinmin - Collaborator
item Dudley, Edwards - Pennsylvania State University
item Figler, Hillary - Pennsylvania State University
item Cottrell, Bryan
item Androzzi, Elisa - Collaborator

Submitted to: Genome Announcements
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/8/2016
Publication Date: 1/12/2017
Citation: Uhlich, G.A., Paoli, G., Zhang, X., Dudley, E.G., Figler, H.M., Cottrell, B.J., Androzzi, E. 2017. Whole-genome sequence of Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 strain PA20. Genome Announcements. doi: 10.1128/genomeA.01460-16.

Interpretive Summary: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 causes hemorrhagic intestinal disease that can be fatal, especially for children and adults with weak immune systems. E. coli can resist disinfectants and antibiotics by forming protective biofilms, a process that is highly regulated and quite variable among different strains. In order to design effective treatments for biofilm-forming strains, it is essential that we understand the genetic mechanisms strains use to control biofilm expression. A complete and accurate genome sequence of target O157:H7 strains is required to measure gene expression and will reveal points of intervention in the bacterial biofilm response. One strain that has been used extensively in biofilm studies is PA20. Here we report the complete genome sequence for use in genetic studies.

Technical Abstract: Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 PA20 is a Pennsylvania Department of Health clinical isolate. It has been used to study biofilm formation in O157:H7 clinical isolates where the high incidence of prophage insertions in the mlrA transcription factor disrupts traditional csgD biofilm regulation. Here we report the complete PA20 genome sequence for use in DNA comparisons and RNA mapping.