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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fort Collins, Colorado » Center for Agricultural Resources Research » Soil Management and Sugarbeet Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #335048

Research Project: Management Practices to Mitigate Global Climate Change, Enhance Bioenergy Production, Increase Soil-C Stocks, and Sustain Soil Productivity and Water Quality

Location: Soil Management and Sugarbeet Research

Title: USDA Agricultural Research Service creates Nutrient Uptake and Outcome Network (NUOnet)

Author
item Delgado, Jorge
item Weyers, Sharon
item Dell, Curtis
item Harmel, Daren
item Kleinman, Peter
item Sistani, Karamat
item Leytem, April
item Huggins, David
item Strickland, Timothy - Tim
item Kitchen, Newell
item Meisinger, John
item Del Grosso, Stephen - Steve
item Johnson, Jane
item Balkcom, Kipling
item Finley, John
item Fukagawa, Naomi
item Powell, Joseph
item Van Pelt, Robert - Scott

Submitted to: Journal of Soil and Water Conservation
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/12/2016
Publication Date: 11/1/2016
Citation: Delgado, J.A., Weyers, S.L., Dell, C.J., Harmel, R.D., Kleinman, P.J., Sistani, K.R., Leytem, A.B., Huggins, D.R., Strickland, T.C., Kitchen, N.R., Meisinger, J.J., Del Grosso, S.J., Johnson, J.M., Balkcom, K.S., Finley, J.W., Fukagawa, N.K., Powell, J.M., Van Pelt, R.S. 2016. USDA Agricultural Research Service creates Nutrient Uptake and Outcome Network (NUOnet) Journal of Soil and Water Conservation. 71(6):147A-148A. https://doi.org/10.2489/jswc.71.6.147A.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.2489/jswc.71.6.147A

Interpretive Summary: The USDA Agricultural Research Service organized a workshop titled, “Collaborative Research and Data Networking – Leveraging GRACEnet-Reap Successes”, which was held from June 14th to 16th, 2016, in Fort Collins, Colorado. One of the key goals of the summer 2016 ARS workshop was to create and encourage the development of database teams that can provide meaningful network systems that collect and store data to make these key national databases available to stakeholders and users. This workshop was in sync with the big data effort from ARS and the goals of ARS National Programs, including some of the goals from the National Program (NP) 212 - Soil and Air and its 2016-2020 Action Plan. Among the efforts of these new and emerging database teams was the plan to develop a national nutrient management database network. A team of scientists from several different national programs that has been in discussions for over a year on how to come together to develop a nutrient management network gathered at the meeting in Fort Collins. Additional members were added during the meeting and after the meeting to develop a NUOnet steering committee. The steering committee developed a flexible road map on how to jumpstart these NUOnet efforts. The NUOnet effort is using the successful database framework already developed and implemented by GRACEnet. The NUOnet vision is, “Efficient use of nutrients to optimize production and product quality of food for animals and humans, fuel and fiber in a sustainable manner that contributes to ecosystem services.” The initial efforts of the steering committee were to develop a vision and a prospectus, which are available at a prototype of the USDA-ARS webpage for NUOnet (Figure 1). The initial GRACEnet database framework will be used to show some of the potential that can be achieved by NUOnet. Available databases will be mined and presented on the prototype webpage for NUOnet. Some of the immediate goals are to develop a pilot NUOnet website with prospectus, strategic goals, annual goals, proposed products, list of steering committee members (with contact information), and list of participants; and to expand the number of ARS and non-ARS cooperators and bring scientists conducting research on nutrient management and scientists conducting research on the nutritional and organoleptic qualities of human and animal foods, together. Additionally, NUOnet will expand the efforts to connect to stakeholder groups and other interest groups (e.g., the 4Rs Institute, university cooperators, NGOs such as “Farm to Field”, and others). Although developing this national database will not be a small task, building over the framework of GRACEnet and REAP, existing/available database systems, will help accelerate these efforts.

Technical Abstract: One of the national goals of USDA-ARS is to conduct research that develops new practices and methods to increase agricultural production and quality with sustainable systems that have a lower environmental impact. When completed, the new NUOnet database system will be able to help in the establishment of baselines for different processes such as nutrient use efficiencies, nutrient losses, processes contributing to optimal crop yield, and nutritional and organoleptic quality. NUOnet could contribute in many different areas to the development and evaluation of new technologies, such as real-time sensing or other proximal and remote sensing technologies to assess nutrient use efficiencies. The NUOnet database could be used to develop and/or calculate different environmental indicators, help increase our understanding of stocks and flows of nutrients, identify potential areas where increased efficiencies can be achieved at a national level, and identify knowledge gaps. NUOnet could also be used to conduct economic analysis and assessment of ecosystem services. NUOnet will not just be a database; it will contribute to increased cooperation between ARS, universities, and extension specialists, as well as to increased cooperation with producers, the private industry, and other partners at a national and international level. The USDA Agricultural Research Service organized a workshop titled, “Collaborative Research and Data Networking – Leveraging GRACEnet-Reap Successes”, which was held from June 14th to 16th, 2016, in Fort Collins, Colorado. One of the key goals of the summer 2016 ARS workshop was to create and encourage the development of database teams that can provide meaningful network systems that collect and store data to make these key national databases available to stakeholders and users. This workshop was in sync with the big data effort from ARS and the goals of ARS National Programs, including some of the goals from the National Program (NP) 212 - Soil and Air and its 2016-2020 Action Plan. Among the efforts of these new and emerging database teams was the plan to develop a national nutrient management database network. A team of scientists from several different national programs that has been in discussions for over a year on how to come together to develop a nutrient management network gathered at the meeting in Fort Collins. Additional members were added during the meeting and after the meeting to develop a NUOnet steering committee. The steering committee developed a flexible road map on how to jumpstart these NUOnet efforts. The NUOnet effort is using the successful database framework already developed and implemented by GRACEnet. The NUOnet vision is, “Efficient use of nutrients to optimize production and product quality of food for animals and humans, fuel and fiber in a sustainable manner that contributes to ecosystem services.” The initial efforts of the steering committee were to develop a vision and a prospectus, which are available at a prototype of the USDA-ARS webpage for NUOnet (Figure 1). The initial GRACEnet database framework will be used to show some of the potential that can be achieved by NUOnet. Available databases will be mined and presented on the prototype webpage for NUOnet. Nutrient management and fertilizers were part of the green revolution that occurred in the 20th century, and helped increase global food production. Nutrient management will still be key for achieving food security during this century. The vision of the NUOnet effort includes connecting nutrient management databases with quality of food for humans and animals. Although there have been a lot of significant positive effects from improved use of nutrients, when applied at greater-than-needed rates the potential for losses of nutrients to the environment increases significantly. Nutrient management practices are important