Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Quality & Safety Assessment Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #327041

Research Project: Assessment and Improvement of Poultry Meat, Egg, and Feed Quality

Location: Quality & Safety Assessment Research

Title: Effect of Myopathies on Meat Quality and Protein Characteristics of Broiler Breast Meat.

Author
item Bowker, Brian
item Zhuang, Hong

Submitted to: Poultry Science Association
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/8/2016
Publication Date: 7/11/2016
Citation: Bowker, B.C., Zhuang, H. 2016. Effect of Myopathies on Meat Quality and Protein Characteristics of Broiler Breast Meat. Poultry Science Association. volume 95(E-Suppl. 1), page 171-172.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The wooden breast (WB) and white striping (WS) conditions are abnormalities that occur in the breast muscles of modern broilers. Although WB and WS are known to adversely affect meat quality, the underlying effect of these conditions on muscle proteins are not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of WB and WS on the meat quality and protein characteristics of broiler breast meat. Breast fillets (Pectoralis major) were collected at 3 h postmortem from a commercial processing plant and segregated into four groups: control (neither WS nor WB), moderate WS-WB (moderate for both WS and WB), severe WS-WB (severe for both WS and WB), and severe WS (severe WS, no WB). Fillets (n=24) were evaluated for pH, color, texture (razor shear method), water holding capacity (salt-induced water uptake), sarcomere length, protein solubility, exudate protein content, and muscle protein composition by SDS-PAGE analysis. Shear energy was greater in severe WS-WB than control fillets (P<0.001), with moderate WS-WB and severe WS samples intermediate. Salt-induced water uptake was greater in control than severe WS-WB fillets (P<0.05), with moderate WS-WB and severe WS samples intermediate. Fillets with WS or WB exhibited greater cook loss than controls (P<0.01). Sarcomere length was shorter in controls compared to fillets with WS or WB (P<0.05). Sarcoplasmic protein solubility was lower in fillets exhibiting WS or WB compared to controls (P<0.01), but myofibrillar protein solubility was not different between groups. The protein concentration of the moisture lost from the fillets as exudate was greater in controls compared to WS or WB fillets (P<0.0001). Electrophoretic protein profiles indicated that the composition of the myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein fractions of the muscles were influenced by both WB and WS. Data demonstrate that the WB condition has a more negative impact on meat texture and water-holding capacity attributes than WS, and that both myopathies cause changes in muscle protein characteristics related to meat quality attributes.