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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Quality Safety and Assessment Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #327039

Research Project: Assessment and Improvement of Poultry Meat, Egg, and Feed Quality

Location: Quality Safety and Assessment Research

Title: Marination performance of broiler breast fillets.

Author
item Bowker, Brian
item Zhuang, Hong

Submitted to: Poultry Science Association
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/8/2016
Publication Date: 7/11/2016
Citation: Bowker, B.C., Zhuang, H. 2016. Marination performance of broiler breast fillets.. Poultry Science Association. volume 95(E-Suppl. 1), page 171.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Vacuum-tumble marination is commonly used to enhance the quality of whole or portioned boneless breast fillets. The relationship between the marination performance of whole fillets and fillet sub-samples is not well understood. The objective of this study was to compare marination performance of fresh and frozen-thawed whole breast fillets and fillet portions. Paired right and left broiler breasts (pectoralis major) were marinated as whole fillets or sub-samples from the cranial (CR) and mid-caudal (CA) portions of the fillets. Samples were marinated at 24 h postmortem (fresh) or stored at -20°C prior to sampling and marination (frozen-thawed). Samples were vacuum-tumbled (559 mm Hg, 8 rpm, 4°C) in 20% wt/wt brine (5% NaCl, 3% STP). Samples were weighed pre-marination, during marination (15, 30, and 45 min), and 24 h post-marination. Samples were cooked to 75°C in a combi-steam oven for determination of cook loss. Brine uptake was greater (P<0.0001) for CA samples than whole fillets or CR samples after 15 min of marination. After 30 min, brine uptake was greater (P<0.05) for CA and whole samples than CR samples. After 45 min, brine uptake for fresh samples was greatest in whole fillets, intermediate for CA samples, and least in CR samples. For frozen-thawed samples, brine uptake at 45 min was greater (P<0.0001) for CA and whole samples than CR samples. For sub-samples, brine uptake at 30 min was greater (P<0.05) in frozen-thawed versus fresh fillets. Differences in brine retention due to treatment (fresh versus frozen-thawed) or sampling (whole versus sub-sample) were not observed. Cook loss was similar between fresh and frozen-thawed samples but was greater (P<0.0001) in sub-samples compared to whole fillets. Correlations between whole fillet and CR sample brine uptakes were greater in fresh (r = 0.64-0.78) than frozen-thawed samples (r = 0.39-0.59). Correlations between whole fillet and CA sample brine uptakes were greater in frozen-thawed (r = 0.79-0.82) than fresh samples (r = 0.46-0.63). Thus, the relationship between the marination performance of whole breast fillets and fillet portions is dependent upon prior sample handling and intra-fillet sampling location.