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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Quality & Safety Assessment Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #321174

Research Project: Optical Detection of Food Safety and Food Defense Hazards

Location: Quality & Safety Assessment Research

Title: Effect of simulated sanitizer carryover on recovery of salmonella from broiler carcass rinsates

Author
item Gamble, Gary
item Berrang, Mark
item Buhr, Richard - Jeff
item Hinton, Jr, Arthur
item Bourassa, Dianna
item Johnston, John - Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS)
item Ingram, Kimberly - Kim
item Adams, Eric
item Feldner, Peggy

Submitted to: Journal of Food Protection
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/7/2016
Publication Date: 5/1/2016
Citation: Gamble, G.R., Berrang, M.E., Buhr, R.J., Hinton Jr, A., Bourassa, D.V., Johnston, J.J., Ingram, K.D., Adams, E.S., Feldner, P.W. 2016. Effect of simulated sanitizer carryover on recovery of salmonella from broiler carcass rinsates. Journal of Food Protection. 79(5):710-714.

Interpretive Summary: Numerous antimicrobial chemicals are currently utilized as processing aids with the aim of reducing pathogenic bacteria on processed poultry carcasses. Carry-over of active sanitizer to a carcass rinse solution intended for detection of viable pathogenic bacteria by regulatory agencies may cause false negative results. This study was conducted to document the potential carry-over effect of five sanitizing chemicals commonly used as poultry processing aids. The five sanitizer solutions were diluted with Buffered Peptone Water to simulate the amount of carry-over at 0, 1, and 5 minutes subsequent to removing the carcasses from the sanitizer solution. These solutions were next spiked with a known concentration of Salmonella and stored at 4 C for 24 hours. After 24 hours, Salmonella numbers were counted for each solution. At 0 and 1 minute drip times, no Salmonella recovery was observed in 3 out of the 5 sanitizers studied. At 5 minute drip time, one of these sanitizers still exhibited significant bactericidal activity. Findings indicate that currently utilized protocol for the recovery of Salmonella from sanitizer interventions may potentially result in a false negative due to sanitizer carry-over into the carcass rinsate.

Technical Abstract: Numerous antimicrobial chemicals are currently utilized as processing aids with the aim of reducing pathogenic bacteria on processed poultry carcasses. Carry-over of active sanitizer to a carcass rinse solution intended for detection of viable pathogenic bacteria by regulatory agencies may cause false negative results. This study was conducted to document the potential carry-over effect of five sanitizing chemicals commonly used as poultry processing aids for broilers in a post-chill dip. The effect of post-dip drip time on the volume of sanitizer solution carry-over was first determined by regression of data obtained from 10 carcasses. The five sanitizer solutions were diluted with Buffered Peptone Water at 0, 1, and 5 minute drip time equivalent volumes as determined by the regression analysis. These solutions were then spiked to 10^5 CFU/ml with a mixture of 5 nalidixic acid resistant Salmonella serovars, stored at 4o C for 24 h, and finally emumerated by plate count on BGS agar containing nalidixic acid. At 0 and 1 minute drip times, no Salmonella recovery was observed in 3 out of the 5 sanitizers studied. At 5 minute drip time, one of these sanitizers still exhibited significant (P= 0.05) bactericidal activity. Findings indicate that currently utilized protocol for the recovery of Salmonella from post-chill sanitizer interventions may potentially result in a false negative due to sanitizer carry-over into the carcass rinsate.