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Title: Qualitative and quantitative analysis of lignocellulosic biomass using infrared techniques: A mini-review

Author
item XU, FENG - KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY
item YU, JIANMING - KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY
item TESSO, TESFAYE - KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY
item Dowell, Floyd
item WANG, DONGHAI - KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Applied Energy
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/5/2012
Publication Date: 1/1/2013
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/56124
Citation: Xu, F., Yu, J., Tesso, T., Dowell, F.E., Wang, D. 2013. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of lignocellulosic biomass using infrared techniques: A mini-review. Applied Energy. 104:801-809.

Interpretive Summary: Lignocellulosic biomass has become an alternative source for production of chemicals and fuels because it is renewable and could reduce greenhouse gas emissions by replacing petroleum sources. The major components of lignocellulosic biomass are cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Current wet chemical methods for biomass composition analysis using two-step sulfuric acid hydrolysis are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and unable to provide structural information about biomass. Infrared techniques provide fast, low-cost analysis, are non-destructive, and have shown promising results. Chemometric analysis has allowed researchers to perform qualitative and quantitative study of biomass with both near-infrared and mid-infrared spectroscopy. This review summarizes the progress and applications of infrared techniques in biomass study, and compares the infrared and the wet chemical methods for composition analysis. In addition to reviewing recent studies of biomass structure and composition, we also discuss the progress and prospects for the applications of infrared techniques.

Technical Abstract: Current wet chemical methods for biomass composition analysis using two-step sulfuric acid hydrolysis are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and unable to provide structural information about biomass. Infrared techniques provide fast, low-cost analysis, are non-destructive, and have shown promising results. Chemometric analysis has allowed researchers to perform qualitative and quantitative study of biomass with both near-infrared and mid-infrared spectroscopy. This review summarizes the progress and applications of infrared techniques in biomass study, and compares the infrared and the wet chemical methods for composition analysis. In addition to reviewing recent studies of biomass structure and composition, we also discuss the progress and prospects for the applications of infrared techniques.