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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fargo, North Dakota » Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center » Sugarbeet and Potato Research » Research » Research Project #435599

Research Project: Mechanisms of Dry Bean Mediated Anti-Obesogenic Activity

Location: Sugarbeet and Potato Research

Project Number: 3060-21650-001-09-S
Project Type: Non-Assistance Cooperative Agreement

Start Date: Sep 1, 2018
End Date: Feb 28, 2021

Objective:
(1) Determine how fat deposition is partitioned in bean-fed versus control-fed mice that are provided isocaloric amounts of diet. (2) Evaluate the extent to which bean consumption affects caloric uptake and the fraction of ingested energy that is excreted in the feces, using a mouse model. (3) Use indirect calorimetry to determine how bean consumption affects respiratory quotient and/or energy expenditure. (4) Examine the role of bean consumption on the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase and its effect on lipid metabolism. (5) Examine functional changes in the gut microbiome mediated by bean consumption, focusing on bile salt hydrolase activity and how this affects farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activity in the ileum.

Approach:
We will investigate critical aspects of energy metabolism that coincide with bean consumption by evaluating the extent to which bean consumption affects caloric uptake and the fraction of ingested energy that is excreted in the feces; determining how fat deposition is partitioned in mice that are fed isocaloric amounts of bean versus non-bean containing diets; and using indirect calorimetry to determine how bean consumption affects respiratory quotient and/or energy expenditure. The role of bean mediated activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on lipid metabolism will be examined to assess the role of bean consumption in the inhibition of lipid accumulation. Studies will include transcriptomic analyses of lipid metabolism. Evidence that bean induces white to beige adipocyte differentiation will be assessed and the role of uncoupling protein1 (UCP1) will be investigated to determine the dependence of bean’s protective activity on increased energy expenditure via uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Finally, to assess the role of intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in mediating the effect of common bean on lipid metabolism in adipocytes and liver, we will examine functional changes in the gut microbiome mediated by bean consumption with an initial focus on bile salt hydrolase activity and how this affects FXR activity in the ileum. Metabolomic analyses will quantify effects on the amounts and types of bile salts in ileum and cecum and on fatty acids, ceramides, and sphingolipids in ileum, liver, plasma, and adipocytes.