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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania » Eastern Regional Research Center » Sustainable Biofuels and Co-products Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #405629

Research Project: Production, Utilization, and Importance of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Sustainable Agriculture

Location: Sustainable Biofuels and Co-products Research

Title: Selection of arbuscular mycorrhizal species to improve nutrient quality of black turtle beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)

Author
item Carrara, Joseph
item Heller, Wade
item REDDIVARI, LAVANYA - Purdue University

Submitted to: Plant Environment Interactions II
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/1/2023
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) as biofertilizers has proven successful in boosting the yield and nutritional quality of a variety of crops. AMF associate with plant roots and exchange soil nutrients for photosynthetically-derived carbon in the form of sugars and lipids. Past research has shown that not all AMF species are equal in their benefit to nutrient uptake and crop health, and that the most beneficial AMF species appear to vary by host species. Although an important human food staple, especially in developing regions, little work has tested the effectiveness of AMF in enhancing the nutritional quality of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). In this study we inoculated black beans with 8 individual AMF species and one mixed-species AMF inocula in a container trial and assessed the extent to which they altered mineral nutrient and anthocyanin concentration of seed and leaf tissues. We found that across treatments, percent root length colonized by AMF was positively correlated with plant tissue mineral concentrations of phosphorus, copper, and zinc. Underlying these broad benefits three individual AMF species (Claroideoglomus claroideum, Funneliformis mosseae, and Gigaspora rosea), but not the mixed species inocula, had higher seed phosphorus concentration than the non-mycorrhizal plants. In addition to enhancing phosphorus concentration, C. claroideum also increased seed potassium and copper, as well as leaf aluminum concentrations making it a promising candidate to further test the benefit of individual AMF species on black bean growth in field trials.

Technical Abstract: The use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) as biofertilizers has proven successful in boosting the yield and nutritional quality of a variety of crops. AMF associate with plant roots and exchange soil nutrients for photosynthetically-derived C in the form of sugars and lipids. Past research has shown that not all AMF species are equal in their benefit to nutrient uptake and crop health, and that the most beneficial AMF species appear to vary by host species. Although an important human food staple, especially in developing regions, little work has tested the effectiveness of AMF in enhancing the nutritional quality of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). In this study we inoculated black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris black turtle beans) with 8 individual AMF species and one mixed-species AMF inocula in a container trial and assessed the extent to which they altered mineral nutrient and anthocyanin concentration of seed and leaf tissues. We found that across treatments, percent root length colonized by AMF was positively correlated with plant tissue P, Cu, and Zn concentrations. Underlying these broad benefits three individual species (Claroideoglomus claroideum, Funneliformis mosseae, and Gigaspora rosea), but not the mixed species inocula, had higher seed P concentration than the non-mycorrhizal plants. In addition to enhancing P concentration, C. claroideum also increased seed potassium (K) and copper (Cu), as well as leaf aluminum (Al) concentrations making it a promising candidate to further test the benefit of individual AMF species on black bean growth in field trials.